Broadcasting, Music, Music Countdowns, Radio, Retro Rock

1972: Outstanding One Hit Wonders

Photo above by Julianne Woodson

I am amazed by the popularity of one hit wonders, and how the topic brings back nostalgic memories for many folks. Three articles that I have written over the past couple of years, about 1969, 1970 and 1971 one hit wonders, are among my most viewed messages of all-time.

With this edition of my musical musings, I am concentrating on the best “one hit wonders” of 1972.  I will be counting down the top songs in this category from 50 years ago.

WROV Roanoke DJ Staff Summer 1972. Photo courtesy of WROV History Website/Pat Garrett

I have fond memories listening to Top 40 radio during 1972.  I turned 17 that year and lived in Roanoke County, Virginia. During daytime hours, I was a regular listener to a couple of local Top 40 AM radio stations:  WROV and WBLU.

My go to station was legendary WROV 1240 AM, which was the top-rated radio outlet in Roanoke. The WROV DJs that I remember during 1972 include Bart Prater, Larry Bly, Dan Alexander, Ron Tompkins, Phil Beckman and Charlie Bell. 

DJ Bart Prater WROV Roanoke: July 10, 1972

WBLU 1480 AM was the other Top 40 outlet in the Roanoke radio market. The only times that I listened to WBLU was traveling via school bus to and from Glenvar High School, and during an afternoon art class that I took during my junior year.

At sundown, WROV reduced their power and WBLU signed off the air, so I tuned in radio stations located hundreds of miles away from my Virginia home. Since radio waves changed on a nightly basis, I would listen to a variety of 50,000-watt, clear channel AM stations on any given night.

There were three main stations that I listened to during the nighttime:  WLS 890 AM Chicago, WCFL 1000 AM and WABC 770 AM New York. On the Big 89 WLS, I remember DJs John Records Landecker, Fred Winston, Chuck Buell and JJ Jeffries.  When tuning in WCFL, I would listen to Larry Lujack, Big Ron O’Brien and Bob Dearborn.  With WABC, I regularly heard Cousin Brucie (Bruce Morrow) and Dan Ingram.

WCFL Chicago Survey August 26, 1972. Courtesy of Pete Battistini: Author of American Top 40 with Casey Kasem (The 1970’s).


A Top 40 radio station that is memorable to me in 1972 was WAPE 690 AM Jacksonville.  My family was on vacation in Florida during July ’72 and I talked my parents into letting me visit the WAPE studios that was located in Orange Park. Since it was my dream to become a DJ once I graduated from high school, getting to visit the “Big APE” was extremely exciting for me.

 During my tour of WAPE, I got to meet music director and afternoon DJ Cleveland Wheeler, who gave me a quick look around the station. Then before leaving, Wheeler allowed me to view the “Big APE” main studio, where Larry Dixon was working his midday DJ shift.

 My visit to WAPE was influential in my pursuit to make radio a career. Less than two years later, I landed a job with WROV Roanoke in April 1974. I was thankful that I had the opportunity to tour the “Big APE” during the summer of 1972.

WAPE Jacksonville Survey February 16, 1972: Courtesy of Daniel McCarthy: Top 40 Radio Surveys Worldwide

What exactly is a “One Hit Wonder?” The basic definition: An artist has only one hit song on the national Billboard Hot 100 pop chart during their career. This music blog message pertains solely to hit songs within the United States.

To avoid any confusion, here are the criteria that I am using to define a one hit wonder:

  • No other songs from an artist ever peaking at number 40 or higher on the Billboard National Pop Chart. (Chart positions from number 40 to number 1).

  • One hit wonders vary from country to country. An artist may have just one hit in the United States but may have multiple hits in another country.

  • Regional hits are not taken into account: A second song must be a national hit and chart within the Billboard Top 40 pop survey.

  • Any songs peaking outside of the Top 40, are always excluded for consideration.

  • Songs that peak from numbers 41 through 100 on the national Billboard Hot 100 pop chart are never considered as second hits.

All documentation of chart positions I share below in this article comes from The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn.  I proudly own a hard copy of this excellent reference manual, which I consider to be the ‘bible” handbook for music history with Top 40 radio.

When I started researching the topic of 1972 one hit wonders, I found some interesting data. There happened to be no artists with only one hit, among the 20 biggest songs from 50 years ago. Below are the top records for 1972, according to Billboard magazine:

1          “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face”            Roberta Flack

2          “Alone Again (Naturally)”       Gilbert O’Sullivan

3          “American Pie”           Don McLean

4          “Without You”               Nilsson

5          “The Candy Man”       Sammy Davis Jr.

6          “I Gotcha”       Joe Tex

7          “Lean on Me”  Bill Withers

8          “Baby, Don’t Get Hooked on Me”      Mac Davis

9          “Brand New Key”        Melanie

10        “Daddy Don’t You Walk So Fast”        Wayne Newton

11        “Let’s Stay Together”  Al Green

12        “Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)”  Looking Glass

13        “Oh Girl”         The Chi-Lites

14        “Nice to Be with You” Gallery

15        “My Ding-a-Ling”        Chuck Berry

16        “(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don’t Want to Be Right”  Luther Ingram

17        “Heart of Gold”           Neil Young

18        “Betcha by Golly, Wow”         The Stylistics

19        “I’ll Take You There”   The Staple Singers

20        “Ben”   Michael Jackson

Before I start sharing my 1972 one hit wonders countdown, I need to correct inaccurate information on the topic.  Some Internet sites erroneously give 1972 one hit wonder status to songs and artists with multiple Top 40 hits. Clearly, the two singles listed below ARE NOT 1972 ONE HIT WONDERS:

  1. Brandy (You’re a Fine Girl)—Looking Glass 

One of my all-time favorite epic story songs from the 70s is actually a two-hit wonder. During the summer of 1972, “Brandy” was a number 1 song.   Looking Glass had a follow up hit in 1973 with “Jimmy Loves Mary Ann” which peaked at number 33 on the Billboard Hot 100. If “Brandy” had truly been the only hit for Looking Glass, it would have made #1 on my 1972 one hit wonder countdown.

  • Layla—Derek & the Dominoes

It is absurd to place Eric Clapton as a one hit wonder. Clapton is the writer, singer and lead guitarist for the song “Layla” which was recorded under his band’s name of Derek & the Dominoes. The only 3-time member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, had 16 Top 40 solo hits, including covering his song “Layla” in 1993. The legendary guitarist also charted multiple top 40 hits, as a member of Cream and the Yardbirds. Absolutely, Eric Clapton is NOT a one hit wonder.

As I surveyed all true one hit wonders from 1972, I found 13 high quality singles that are on my countdown. These are songs that I deem to be culturally, historically, aesthetically significant, meaningful or relevant. Ahead of my countdown beginning, I want to share some extra songs that didn’t make my Baker’s Dozen listing.

Amazing Grace by Royal Scots Dragoon Guards peaked at #11 on Billboard Hot 100 in 1972

Novelty records that were one hit wonders in 1972:  

•          Jungle Fever—The Chakachas

•          How Do You Do—Mouth and Macneal

•          The Delegates—Convention 72

Six-extra ’72 one hit wonders. These selections are all quality songs, that fell just outside of my Baker’s Dozen countdown:

  • White Lies Blue Eyes—Bullet
  • Small Beginnings—Flash
  • Easy Livin’—Uriah Heap
  • Run Run Run—Jo Jo Gunne
  • Hallelujah—Sweathog
  • Suavecito—Malo

Without further ado, here are what I consider to be the 13 best one hit wonders from 1972. My Baker’s Dozen countdown starts now:

13. Hot Rod Lincoln—Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen

Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100: #9, 69th Biggest Hit of 1972

Novelty tune. Commander Cody’s band combines country, rock, pop and western swing genres of music. Lyrics describe illegal auto racing in California.

12. Popcorn—Hot Butter

Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100: #9, 28th Biggest Hit of 1972

First of two instrumental tunes on the countdown. Music composed by Gershon Kingsley.  Conductor Stan Free utilizes a Moog synthesizer on this song.

11. Good Time Charlie’s Got the Blues—Danny O’Keefe

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #5 Adult Contemporary #9 Hot 100 in 1972

Folk singer-songwriter from Spokane, Washington. Danny O’Keefe has written hundreds of songs recorded by other artists: most prominent include Elvis Presley, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, John Denver, Jackson Browne and Glen Campbell.

10. Motorcycle Mama—Sailcat

Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100: #12, 89th Biggest Hit of 1972

Southern rock band from Alabama. Song written by Sailcat member John Wyker. The group decided to break up in 1973, after “Motorcycle Mama” was their only Billboard Hot 100 chart success.

9.   Day by Day—Godspell

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #8 Easy Listening, #13 Hot 100 in 1972

Cast from the Off-Broadway musical Godspell, are featured on this folk-rock ballad. Parables from the biblical book of Matthew provide lyrical content for this successful anthem.

8.   Beautiful Sunday—Daniel Boone

Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 #15, 42nd Biggest Song of 1972

English pop musician. Daniel Boone named “Most Likable Singer” by Rolling Stone magazine in 1972. According to Wikipedia, “Beautiful Sunday” is the biggest selling single by an international artist in modern Japanese musical history.

7.   Thunder and Lighting—Chi Coltrane

Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 #17, Cash Box #15, Record World #12

Pianist, singer-songwriter with rock and gospel music genres. American Chi Coltrane was known as “The First Lady of Rock” in the United States and the “Queen of Rock” throughout Europe during the 70s.

6.   Sunshine—Jonathan Edwards.

Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 #4, 37th Biggest Song of 1972

Country folk-rock song.  Jonathan Edwards was born in Aitkin, Minnesota. Opened up tours for the Allman Brothers Band and B.B. King after “Sunshine” became a hit tune.

5.   Joy—Apollo 100

Peak Positions on Billboard Hot 100 #6, 71st Biggest Song of 1972

The second instrumental song on the countdown.  “Joy” It is an up tempo contemporary rendition of a 1723 composition by Johann Sebastian Bach called “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring.”

4.   Precious and Few—Climax

Peak Position of Billboard Hot 100 #3, 30th Biggest Song of 1972

Soft rock band from Los Angeles, California. Lead singer of Climax was Sonny Geraci, who also provided lead vocals on the song “Time Won’t Let Me” from his former band the Outsiders during 1966.

3.   Bang a Gong (Get It On)—T. Rex

Peak Position of Billboard Hot 100 #10, 56th Biggest Song of 1972

Originally named Tyrannosaurus Rex, the English glam rock band shorten their name to T. Rex in 1969. Song written by front man Marc Bolan. Among one of the best glitter rock singles from the 70s.

2.   The City of New Orleans—Arlo Guthrie.

Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 #18, 45th Biggest Song of Year

Late singer-songwriter Steve Goodman portrays a train ride from Chicago to New Orleans on the Illinois Central Railroad and their legendary “City of New Orleans” rail line.  The song was written in 1971, after Amtrak took over servicing the famous railroad route from Illinois Central. Arlo Guthrie’s biggest Top 40 hit.

  1. Hold Your head up—Argent

Peak Position on Billboard Hot 100 #5, 50th Biggest Song of 1972.

As a founding member of the Zombies, Ron Argent was keyboardist and a chief song-writer for his British rock band.  He penned 3 of the Zombies biggest hits:  “She’s Not There”, “Tell Her No” & “Time of the Season.”  

In 1969, Ron Argent left the Zombies and formed a new rock band, named after himself:  Argent. Three years later, the band released the album “All Together Now” which featured Argent’s only song to chart on the Billboard Hot 100: “Hold Your Head Up.”

Here is what legendary keyboardist Rick Wakeman proclaims in a Louder Sound Dot COM quote: “Rod (Argent) is a good friend, and I’m not just picking people because they’re my mates, I’m picking this because it’s brilliant. The organ solo in “Hold Your Head Up” is, for me, one of the finest organ solos on a record. It’s brilliantly put together, and from an era where you couldn’t go back and correct notes and redo things. It’s a true solo. A little work of art, so it has to go in. It’s just brilliant, so good.”

The first time that I heard Argent’s song was via radio, on WAPE Jacksonville and the Big APE played it multiple times the week I was on vacation in Florida (July ’72).   I loved the song when it was a hit and still have fondness for the tune nearly 50 years later.  Without a doubt, my top number 1 outstanding one hit wonder from 1972 is “Hold Your Head Up” by Argent.

Now that I have humbly submitted my countdown of 1972 one hit wonders, I am curious to find out your opinion on this topic. Obviously, I do not want to come across as authoritative with my critique.  The songs that you feel are the best may be completely different from my selections.

 What do you consider to be the best one hit wonders from 1972?  There are no right or wrong answers. I welcome your thoughts.

I leave you with lyrics from a 1972 Mac Davis authored song, “I Believe in Music” that pop rock band Gallery covered during 1972: “Music is the universal language, and love is the key, to peace hope and understanding, and living in harmony.”   Rock on!

To subscribe to my blog via email, please click the “Follow” button in the menu above.

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Broadcasting, Music, Music Countdowns, Radio, Retro Rock

Supreme Disco Hits of the 70s

Photo above by Julianne Woodson

Over the years, I have had many conversations about 70s disco music with friends or acquaintances. At some point during those types of musical discussions, I will ask the question: “What do you consider to be the best Top 40 disco hits of the 70s decade?”

Responses to my inquiries about the greatest disco hits will vary but many folks will choose multiple songs by the same artist, when selecting their favorite 70s disco tunes.

While there isn’t anything wrong with picking multiple songs from the same artist in a listing of the best disco songs from the 70s, I am choosing different methodology in coming up with my own compilation of superior disco singles.

Eagles had a number 1 hit in 1975 with “One of These Nights” which features a disco beat.

For this music blog message, I will be counting down what I consider to be the 20 best disco singles by 20 different artists. Here are the rules and criteria that I have set forth for this musical exercise:

  •  Each artist, group, band or singer will have just one song listed on the top 20 countdown.
  • All selections were hits on Top 40 radio and charted at number 20 or lower on the Billboard Hot 100.
  • I deem each of my selections to be culturally, historically, aesthetically significant, meaningful or relevant.
  • Song charted nationally on Billboard Hot 100 between 1975 and 1979.
Kiss had a top 10 disco hit in the summer of 1979 with “I Was Made for Lovin’ You.”

The term “disco” is shorthand for the word discothèque, a French word for “library of phonograph records.”

Please note that I will not be giving a complete history of disco music with this message. For those who long for more information, there are multiple books, articles and links via the Internet on this topic.

Electric Light Orchestra reached #8 on Billboard Hot 100 in 1979 with “Shine a Little Love.”

Genesis of disco music wasn’t instantaneous but evolved during the first years of the 70s.

Below is a partial listing of Top 40 hits that were precursors to the formation of disco between 1971 and 1973.

  • Theme from Shaft—Isaac Hayes
  • Funky Nassau—The Beginning of the End
  • Rock Steady—Aretha Franklin
  • Jungle Fever—Chakachas
  • Soul Makossa—Manu Dibango
  • Superfly—Curtis Mayfield
  • Papa Was a Rolling Stone—The Temptations
  • Masterpiece—The Temptations
  • Love Train—The O’Jays
  • The Love I Lost—Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes

During the first few months of 1974, a couple of proto-disco songs became hits on top 40 radio. Both tunes reached number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100:

  • Love’s Theme—The Love Unlimited Orchestra (Barry White)

  • TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia)—MFSB and the Three Degrees

During April 1974, I landed my first job in radio, working for Top 40 WROV Roanoke (1240 AM). For the next 18 months, I witnessed firsthand the tremendous growth of disco music at Roanoke’s top rated Top 40 outlet.

Dave Woodson playing records at Top 40 WROV Roanoke remote broadcast. Discount Records Tanglewood Mall.

One of the most popular songs that I played during the summer of 1974 on WROV is “Rock the Boat” by the Hues Corporation. This up-tempo classic R&B/Soul tune was number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and is considered by some music historians as the earliest disco song to be a mainstream hit.

Another landmark recording of disco music from the summer of 1974 is “Rock Your Baby” by George McCrae.  Co-written and produced by Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch of KC & the Sunshine Band, the song sold over 11 million copies worldwide.

Other Top 40 disco hits in 1974:

  • Never Can Say Goodbye—Gloria Gaynor
  • You’re the First, The Last, My Everything—Barry White
  • When Will I See You Again—Three Degrees
  • Kung Fu Fighting—Carl Douglas

It was during the summer of 1975 that I realized that disco music was going to be huge, when “The Hustle” by Van McCoy was the number 1 song in Roanoke and nationally on the Billboard Hot 100.

My radio station WROV had a remote broadcast at the Kings Inn, a nightclub on Salem Avenue in downtown Roanoke.  I was engineer for this 3-hour remote and spun 45-rpm singles, which included all of the top 10 songs from the WROV playlist.

When I played Van McCoy’s number 1 hit during the first 15 minutes on the Kings Inn remote, just about every patron at the nightclub went on the dance floor to “do the hustle.” Because of the overwhelming positive response when I played the disco hit, Kings Inn management requested that I spin “The Hustle” a few more times before the remote was scheduled to end.

After I consulted with my fellow WROV staff members, I broke the station’s format and played “The Hustle” two other times that evening.  Close to 100 percent of everyone in the building danced on my second and third plays of Van McCoy’s hit.  Needless to say, disco music was alive and well in Roanoke that night at the Kings Inn.

The Royal Kings were the house band for Roanoke’s 70s premier nightclub, the Kings Inn. Photo is a scan from a Roanoke Times newspaper article, provided to me by band member Larry Wheeling, who is pictured above.

Other Top 40 disco hits in 1975:

  • Pick Up the Pieces—Average White Band
  • Lady Marmalade—LaBelle
  • Express—BT Express
  • That’s the Way (I Like It)—KC & the Sunshine Band
  • Fly, Robin, Fly—Silver Convention
  • Jive Talkin’—The Bees Gees

My time playing disco records ended in November 1975 as I accepted a full-time radio job with AM/FM combo WRIS 1410 and WJLM 93.5 Roanoke.  However, I still tracked the genre of music listening to various Top 40 stations including WROV, WLS Chicago and WABC New York.

Before I reveal my countdown of supreme disco hits, I am sharing ten songs that I considered for the Top 20 but didn’t make the cut.  These selections are listed in random order with no repeat artists:

  • Disco Inferno—The Tramps
  • Car Wash—Rose Royce
  • Miss You—Rolling Stones
  • Don’t Leave Me this Way—Thelma Houston
  • I Love the Nightlife—Alicia Bridges

  • Knock on Wood—Amii Stewart
  • Who Loves You—The Four Seasons
  • Turn the Beat Around—Vickie Sue Robinson
  • Ain’t No Stopping Us Now—McFadden & Whitehead
  • Ring My Bell—Anita Ward

All documentation of chart positions I share below, comes from The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn.  I proudly own a hard copy of this excellent reference manual, which I consider to be the “bible” handbook for music history with Top 40 radio.

I now present what I consider to be the top 20 best disco songs from the 70s. As Casey Kasem used to say on his American Top 40 show, “Now on with the countdown.”

20.  Best of My Love—The Emotions (1977)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100, 3rd Biggest Song of 1977

Written by Maurice White and Al McKay of Earth Wind & Fire.  Won Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance. Billboard proclaims “Best of My Love” at number 1 on the “Top 40 Biggest Girl Group Songs of All Time” list.

19.  More, More, More—Andrea True Connection (1976)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #4 Hot 100, 17th Biggest Song of 1976

Signature song for Andrea True. International hit. Excellent horn section on tune. Canadian alternative rock duo Len sampled “More, More, More” on their 1999 hit “Steal My Sunshine.”

18.  Got to Give it Up—Marvin Gaye (1977)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100, 20th Biggest Song of 1977

Marvin Gaye’s first recording of disco. Falsetto vocals. Outstanding percussion instrumentation with R&B/Funk guitar riffs. Worldwide smash. Number 1 song on 3 Billboard charts.

17.  Love Hangover—Diana Ross (1976)

Peak Positions on Billboard Hot 100: #1 Hot 100, 15th Biggest Song of 1976

Superb bass line. Tempo of song starts as ballad, changes to fast groove. Motown’s first disco hit.  Fourth Billboard Hot 100 number 1 hit for Diana Ross as a solo artist.

16.  Boogie Nights—Heat Wave (1977)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #2 Hot 100, 93rd Biggest Song of 1977

Funk/Disco international band. Two members from United States, three from European Countries and one Jamaican. “Always and Forever” and “The Groove Line” were two other smash tunes by Heat Wave.

15.  Dancing Queen—ABBA (1977)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100, 12th Biggest Song of 1977

ABBA’s most recognizable and popular song. Inducted into Grammy Hall of Fame in 2015. Melodic tune and excellent vocal harmonies by Swedish quartet. Reached number 1 in 14 countries around the world.

14.  Lowdown—Boz Scaggs (1976)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #3 Hot 100, 49th Biggest Song of 1976

Co-written by Boz Scaggs and David Paich. Song is categorized in multiple musical genres. R&B, Disco, Jazz and Yacht Rock. Won a Grammy Award for best R&B song.

13.  Got to Be Real—Cheryl Lynn (1979)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #12 Hot 100, 69th Biggest Song of 1979

Considered a one hit wonder. Cheryl Lynn was former gospel singer. Discovered on the Gong Show in 1976. Song inducted into the Dance Music Hall of Fame in 2005.

12.  Ladies Night—Kool & the Gang (1979)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #8 Hot 100, 35th Biggest Song of 1979

American Funk/R&B band. First of 3 top 10 hits for group during 1979/1980. An anthem for disco bars and nightclubs. Promoting female patrons to venues all across America.

11.  We Are Family—Sister Sledge (1979)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #2 Hot 100, 53rd Biggest Song of 1979

Siblings Debbie, Joni, Kim and Kathy Sledge from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Lyrics express family solidarity. Signature song and biggest hit for Sister Sledge.  Selected by the National Recording Registry/Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or artistically significant” in 2017.

10.  Shake Your Groove Thing—Peaches & Herb (1979)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #5 Hot 100, 31st Biggest Song of 1979

A reformed Peaches & Herb duo formed in the 70s with new singer Linda Greene joining founding member Herb Fame. “Shake Your Groove Thing” and “Reunited” were mega hits for the R&B/disco pair during 1979.

9.    Shame—Evelyn “Champagne” King (1978)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #9 Hot 100, 64th Biggest Song of 1978

 Singer born in The Bronx, New York City. Evelyn King had four Top 40 hits. None bigger than “Shame.” Song features excellent saxophone section and superb bass line. R&B/Funk smash single.

8.    Get Down Tonight—KC & the Sunshine Band (1975)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100, 64th Biggest Song of 1975

The first of 5 number 1 hits on Billboard Hot 100 for South Florida band. Fast tempo. Excellent guitar solo.  Superb mixture of R&B, funk and disco.

7.    I Will Survive—Gloria Gaynor

Peak positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100, 6th Biggest Song of 1979

Lyrics have become an anthem for female empowerment. Inducted into Library of Congress National Recording Registry in 2016.  “I Will Survive” received a Grammy Award for “Best Disco Recording.”

6.    Good Times—Chic (1979)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100, 20th Biggest Song of 1979

Written by Chic band members Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers. Song has legendary bass line riff and is one of the most sampled tunes in music history. 

Backing track from “Good Times” was used on the first Top 40 hip-hop hit, “Rapper’s Delight” by Sugarhill Gang.  Comes in at number 68 on Rolling Stone “Greatest Songs of All Time” list.

5.    Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough—Michael Jackson (1979)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100, 91st Biggest Song of 1979

Produced by Quincy Jones and written by Michael Jackson.  It was the biggest solo hit of the 70s by the “King of Pop.”  Musically, it features a six-piece horn ensemble of saxophones, trumpets and trombone.  A sterling string section also adds to the rich sound on this tune.

“Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” was a world-wide hit, and helped pave the way for Jackson’s superstar status during the 80s.  The singer received a Grammy Award for “Male R&B Vocal Performance” with this popular disco smash.

4.    Heart of Glass—Blondie (1979)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100, 18th Biggest Song of 1979

 Brilliant “New Wave” meets “Disco” mix by New York rock band. Magnificent combination of synthesizers, drum machine and guitar. Blondie’s singer Debbie Harry shines on vocals.

“Heart of Glass” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2015. It was the first of 4 number 1 songs on the Billboard Hot 100 for the 2016 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame band.

3.    September—Earth Wind & Fire (1979)

Peak Positions of Billboard Charts: #8 Hot 100, 78th Biggest Song of 1979

“September” is a quintessential song with multiple genres of music:  R&B, Soul, Funk, Jazz, Disco and Yacht Rock.  Upbeat, feel-good groove. Philip Bailey and Maurice White share lead vocals on this successful song.

Highlighted by transcendent saxophone, trumpet, trombone, guitar and keyboards. Earth Wind & Fire’s most beloved song, was added to Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry list of sound recordings in 2018. 

2.    Stayin’ Alive—The Bee Gees (1978)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #1 Hot 100, 4th Biggest Song of 1978

Coming in second on the countdown is my selection by the Bee Gees. Written by brothers Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb, biggest song from the “Saturday Night Fever” motion picture soundtrack. Great guitar hook with a pulsating beat.

“Stayin’” Alive” is one of the most iconic disco songs from the 70s. Rolling Stone ranks it at number 99 on their “Greatest Songs of All Time” listing. Placed in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. This signature song from the Bees Gees, is my second-best disco single of the 70s.

  1. I Feel Love—Donna Summer (1977)

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #6 Hot 100, 96th Biggest Song of 1977

When I think of the greatest disco artist from the 70s, there is only one person who fits that bill: Donna Summer.  The “Queen of Disco” was one of the leading female vocalists during the disco era of music and then extending into the early 80s.

“I Feel Love” is one of the most influential songs of the 20th century.  Music historians believe that the 1977 disco hit, had a major impact in the development of electronic dance music (EDM).  Many who chronicle music history, consider the Donna Summer single to be the first ever recorded EDM song.

Summer’s ground breaking song also had a significant impact with other genres of music, such as New Wave, Punk Rock, Synth-Pop, House, and Disco, during the late 70s, early 80s and beyond. 

Giorgio Moroder and Pete Bellotte produced and co-wrote “I Feel Love” along with Donna Summer.  The use of a Moog synthesizer, with a repetitive beat, gives the tune a hypnotic, rhythmic feel, that was popular on disco dance floors all across America.

Without a doubt, I proclaim that “I Feel Love” by Donna Summer is the most supreme disco hit from the 70s.

After I finished compiling information for the 20 songs listed above, I realized an interesting fact. Over the past 5 years, I have regularly played many of these songs at wedding receptions, class reunions and other similar events where I am hired for DJ gigs.  My 20 selected disco tunes are still popular with those who want to dance.

Now that I have humbly submitted my countdown of the top 20 supreme disco songs of the 70s, I am curious to find out your opinion on this topic. Obviously, I do not want to come across as authoritative with my critique on what I consider to be the best disco songs. The songs that you feel are the best may be completely different from my selections.

I am asking for your opinion: What do you consider to be the best disco songs from the 70s? There are no right or wrong answers. I welcome your thoughts.

If you are a fan of 70s disco music, I welcome your comments below.  I leave you with these lyrics by Alicia Bridges and Susan Hutcheson: “I love the nightlife, I got to boogie on the disco ’round.” Disco on!

To subscribe to my blog via email, please click the “Follow” button in the menu above.

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AT40, Broadcasting, Music, Music Countdowns, Radio, Retro Rock

Totally Tubular MTV Videos and Songs:  Aired During First Year 1981-1982

Photo above by Julianne Woodson

What are the best videos and songs that Music Television cable channel (MTV) aired during their first full year of operation?  Obviously, there are no definitive answers to my question.

However, I will be sharing what I consider to be the top 20 MTV songs and clips broadcast by the pioneer 24 hour-a-day music channel during their premiere year (August 1, 1981 – July 31, 1982).

During the first full year of MTV’s existence, the music video channel struggled as it was not available on most cable providers in the United States. It wasn’t until the third year of MTV that it became a major force and revolutionized the music industry.

MTV was launched the first day of August 1981.  The new cable channel played music videos 24 hours-a-day and featured hosts known as video jockeys (VJs).  These individuals gave information on the music clips played and provided news about the artists that aired on MTV.

The programming that MTV utilized during the first year was similar to AOR (Album Oriented Rock) or Top 40 radio formats. Initially, MTV played established artists but later became a venue for many new pop rock bands during the second and third years of operation.

According to Wikipedia, here are the first 10 videos aired by MTV on August 1, 1981:

* “Video Killed the Radio Star” The Buggles

       *   “You Better Run” Pat Benatar

       *    “She Won’t Dance With Me” Rod Stewart

       *   “You Better You Bet” The Who

       *   “Little Suzi’s on the Up” Ph. D.

       *   “We Don’t Talk Anymore” Cliff Richard

       *   “Brass in Pocket” The Pretenders

       *    “Time Heals” Todd Rundgren

       *    “Take It on the Run” REO Speedwagon

       *    “Rockin’ the Paradise” Styx

Videos for songs played within the first year of MTV must be judged differently than clips made during the 1983 to 1985 time period.  Many of the early clips aired on MTV were of concert footage or live show performances. The production of concept videos soared after MTV’s debut and was a mainstay for the music TV cable channel during the 80s decade.

By 1985, there were many excellent created videos that made the MTV hot rotation.  “Take On Me” by the Norwegian synth-pop band A-ha had a superb clip. The award-winning video used pencil-sketched animation and live-action footage combination called rotoscoping.

Another bodacious video clip from 1985 is “Money for Nothing” by Dire Straits. Opening lyrics on the song are provided by guest vocalist Sting singing the promotional phrase of the video channel, “I Want My MTV.”  The ground breaking clip was MTV’s, “Video of the Year” in 1986.

When MTV started on 8/1/81, the music TV channel aired many existing videos of songs that had been top 40 hits from either 1980 or the first 7 months of 1981. 

Of the top 10 biggest records from 1981, only half of the songs had videos available that could be aired by MTV. Below are the Billboard top-rated songs of 1981:

1          “Bette Davis Eyes”      Kim Carnes

2          “Endless Love” Diana Ross & Lionel Richie

3          “Lady” Kenny Rogers

4          “(Just Like) Starting Over”      John Lennon

5          “Jessie’s Girl”  Rick Springfield

6          “Celebration”  Kool & the Gang

7          “Kiss on My List”         Hall & Oates

8          “I Love a Rainy Night” Eddie Rabbitt

9          “9 To 5”           Dolly Parton

10        “Keep on Loving You” REO Speedwagon

After the launching of MTV, most every major record company would produce some type of music video for new song releases.  These record companies hoped that MTV would add their new song to its regular rotation of music clips.

Below are the ten biggest singles of 1982 according to Billboard and a selection from the videos MTV aired on their network:

1          “Physical”        Olivia Newton-John

2          “Eye of the Tiger”       Survivor

3          “I Love Rock ‘n Roll”    Joan Jett & The Blackhearts

4          “Ebony and Ivory”       Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder

5          “Centerfold”    The J. Geils Band

6          “Don’t You Want Me” The Human League

7          “Jack & Diane” John Cougar

8          “Hurts So Good”         John Cougar

9          “Abracadabra” Steve Miller Band

10        “Hard to Say I’m Sorry”           Chicago

One of the chief criticisms of MTV during its first 18 months of operation was the lack of music by Black artists being played on the cable TV channel.  It wasn’t until March 1983, that Michael Jackson’s video for “Billie Jean” was added and became the first video by a Black artist to be aired in heavy rotation on MTV. Without a doubt, “Billie Jean” is the best video from the second year of MTV.

For the rest of this message, I will be counting down what I consider to be the best songs and videos that were aired on MTV during the first 12 months.  My selections all were top 40 radio hits and peaked at number 20 or lower on the Billboard Hot 100 between August 1981 and July 1982.

Please note:  I am not declaring that my picks are either the “best or greatest” that MTV played during its first year.  The song choices are my personal favorites from this time period. I deem the top 20 songs to be culturally, historically, aesthetically significant, meaningful or relevant.

Chart information for my favorite Top 20 MTV song of the countdown comes from, “The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits” by Joel Whitburn. I consider Whitburn’s publication to be the “bible” of Top 40 music reference and still proudly own a hard copy of this excellent music guide.

As legendary DJ host Casey Kasem used to proclaim on his weekly American Top 40 show, “Now on with the countdown.”

20.  Don’t Stop Believin’—Journey

Peak Positions of Billboard Charts:  #9 Hot 100: 73rd Biggest Song of 1982

First of two Journey songs on countdown. Arena rock anthem of the 80s.  Ranked at number 133 on Rolling Stone’s “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” listing.

19.  Leader of the Band—Dan Fogelberg

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 AC: #9 Hot 100: 35th Biggest Song of 1982

Dan Fogelberg wrote “Leader of the Band” as a tribute to his father Lawrence Fogelberg. One of two songs on my countdown by the singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who died in 2007.

18.  Waiting for a Girl Like You—Foreigner

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #2 Hot 100: 19th Biggest Song of 1982

This power ballad spent 10 weeks in the number 2 position on the Billboard Hot 100 without ever reaching the top of the chart.  Thomas Dolby plays synthesizer on record-setting track.

17.  The Night Owls—The Little River Band

Peak Position on Billboard Charts: #6 Hot 100:  #9 Top Rock Tracks

Biggest Top 40 hit in the 80s for Australian rock band.  “Man on Your Mind” and “Take It Easy on Me” were two other hits Little River Band had during the first year of MTV.

16.  Who’s Crying Now—Journey

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #4 Hot 100:  56th Biggest Song of 1981

Written by Steve Perry and Jonathan Cain. First single released from the Journey’s most successful album “Escape.”  Perry’s vocals are outstanding.  Second song from the arena rock band on my countdown.

15.  Heat of the Moment—Asia

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #4 Hot 100: 40th Biggest Song of 1982

Debut single from English progressive rock supergroup. Band members John Wetton and Geoff Downes wrote the signature song for Asia.

14.  The Break Up Song (They Don’t Write Em)—Greg Kihn Band

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #15 Hot 100: 47th Biggest Song of 1981

Power pop rock band.  First of three Top 40 hits. Greg Kihn Band also scored with “Jeopardy” and “Lucky” during the 80s on MTV.

13.  Empty Garden—Elton John

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #13 Hot 100: 76th Biggest Song of 1982

Composed by Elton John and Bernie Taupin.  Tribute song to John Lennon, who was assassinated in New York City on December 8, 1980. Elton was friends with the former Beatle member, prior to Lennon’s death.

12.  The Voice—The Moody Blues

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #1 Mainstream Rock: #15 Hot 100

Second top 15 in 1981 hit for English progressive rock band. Along with “Gemini Dream” single, “The Voice” came from the Moody Blues comeback album, “Long Distance Voyager.”

11.  Young Turks—Rod Stewart

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #5 Hot 100:  48th Biggest Song of 1982

Rod Stewart changed musical sound on this hybrid pop/new wave/synthpop tune. “Young Turks” holds the distinction of being the first video aired on MTV containing breakdancing.

10.  Fire and Ice—Pat Benatar

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #2 Mainstream Rock #17 Hot 100

Pre-eminent rock singer of the early 80s. Pat Benatar won a Grammy award in 1982 for Best Female Rock Performance with “Fire and Ice.”

9.    Shake It Up—The Cars

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #4 Hot 100: 23rd Biggest Song of 1982

Danceable power pop rock describes the song written by Ric Ocasek. “Shake It Up” was one of the Cars biggest singles during the 80s.

8.    Chariots of Fire—Vangelis

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100: #1 Hot Soul Singles: 12th Biggest Song of 1982

“Chariots of Fire” was an unlikely instrumental Top 40 hit.  The song score was written by Vangelis and is featured in the British historical sports film Chariots of Fire. Melodic tune has been used on multiple Summer and Winter Olympic Game broadcasts since 1984.

7.    Edge of Seventeen—Stevie Nicks

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #4 Mainstream Rock: #11 Hot 100:

Stevie Nicks wrote the song sub-titled “Just Like the White Wing Dove” as a result of two events happening the same week in December 1980:  The death of her uncle Jonathan and the assassination of John Lennon.  It is the first of two songs on my countdown by the Fleetwood Mac singer.

6.    I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do)—Hall & Oates

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #1 Hot 100:  15th Biggest Song of 1982

Daryl Hall and John Oates: Biggest duo of the 20th Century. Their song topped both the Billboard Hot 100 and Hot Soul Singles charts in 1982.  Knocked off “Physical” by Olivia Newton-John” out of number 1 position after a 10-week run.

5.    867-5309/Jenny—Tommy Tutone

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #4 Hot 100: 16th Biggest Song of 1982

Tommy Tutone is a two-hit wonder. “Angel Say No” peaked at number 38 on Billboard Hot 100 in 1980.  867-5309 was a popular phone number of music fans throughout the 80s decade.

4.    Run for the Roses—Dan Fogelberg

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #3 Adult Contemporary #18 Hot 100

My second Dan Fogelberg countdown selection is a melodious song about various aspects of horse racing.  “Run For the Roses” is from “The Innocent Age” album and is now considered as an unofficial theme song for the Kentucky Derby, which happens the first Saturday of May each year.

3.    Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around—Stevie Nicks & Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #3 Hot 100: 59th Biggest Song of 1981

The coming together of Stevie Nicks and Tom Petty provided musical magic with their rock duet. From the debut Nicks “Bella Donna” solo album, “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” was actually the 25th video played on MTV’s first day of operation, August 1, 1981.

2.    Our Lips Are Sealed—The Go-Gos

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #20 Hot 100: 63rd Biggest Song of 1982

  Debut single for 2021 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame band.  Rolling Stone ranks 57th greatest pop song of all time.  From the Go-Gos “Beauty and the Beat” album. “Our Lips Our Sealed” is my second favorite power pop rock single of the 80s.

1.    Every Little Thing She Does is Magic—The Police

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #3 Hot 100: 79th Biggest Song of 1982

 My top selection was written by the Police front man/bassist Sting in 1976 but wasn’t recorded until 1981 for the “Ghost in the Machine” album.  The song is unique among Police music as the tune features Jean Alain Roussel on piano and synthesizer. Andy Summers, Stewart Copeland and Sting blend together a perfect pop song, that is truly magic for me.  “Every Little Thing She Does is Magic” is my pick for best song and video aired by MTV during the first year in business.

Now that I have my countdown of favorite first-year MTV songs and video that were hits on Top 40 radio, I am curious to find out your thoughts on this topic.

Obviously, I do not want to come across as authoritative with the critique of my favorite MTV videos and songs from 1981-1982.  Your top selections maybe be completely different than my choices.  There are no right or wrong answers, just various opinions about the music song videos MTV played during their first year in business.

“I Want My MTV” was the main promotional slogan from the music TV cable channel in the early 80s.  MTV doesn’t play music videos anymore but I still can enjoy watching video clips 24/7 via YouTube and or the Internet. 

I still have fond memories of MTV songs and videos from the first year:  1981-1982.  Rock on!

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Best Sunshine Pop Singles of the 60s

Photo above by Julianne Woodson

What do artists like the Beach Boys, the Mamas & the Papas, the Association, the Turtles and the 5th Dimension all have in common?  Each of these Southern California groups were hit makers during the mid to late 60s, with a refreshing brand of music called Sunshine Pop.

With my latest edition of DJ Dave’s Musical Musings, I will be counting down what I consider to be the best Sunshine Pop Top 40 singles from the 60s decade. My selections were all hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, during the golden age of Sunshine Pop (1965-1969).

What is Sunshine Pop?  Wikipedia describes the type of rock music as, “cheerful, upbeat music which is characterized by warm sounds, prominent vocal harmonies, lush vocals, light arrangements and sophisticated productions. Rooted in easy listening and advertising jingles, sunshine pop acts combined nostalgic or anxious moods with an appreciation for the beauty of the world.”

Originating in California during the mid 60s, Sunshine Pop combined segments of folk-rock, soft pop, progressive rock, Baroque pop and Psychedelia.  Some tunes in this category are slow grooves, but most songs featured breezy, up-tempo beats.

The term Sunshine Pop did not exist during the 60s so it is difficult to pin-point an exact beginning to this sub-genre of pop rock music.  It appears that Sunshine Pop happened because of multiple musical influences as a wide range of musicians and record producers converged together around Los Angeles, California, during 1965 and 1966.

My dog Penny Lane and I with a vinyl copy of “Pet Sounds” album by the Beach Boys. The album was a Father’s Day gift to me in 2016, on the 50th anniversary of “Pet Sounds” LP release.

Some of the more instrumental players in the development of Sunshine Pop include:

  • The Beatles and “Beatlemania” permeates America in 1964
  • British Invasion bands other than the Beatles (1964-1965)
  • Folk rock bands like the Byrds/Roger McGuinn
  • Phil Spector Wall of Sound record producer
  • John Phillips of the Mamas & the Papas
  • Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys
  • Pet Sounds album by the Beach Boys
  • Curt Boettcher Record Producer
  • The Wrecking Crew: Los Angeles session musicians

The Beatles are the most influential band of the rock era and they changed the course of musical history during the 60s.  The band’s impact on all types of pop/rock music is legendary and their musical fingerprints are all over what now is called Sunshine Pop. “Good Day Sunshine” from the Beatles “Revolver” album is noteworthy for being influential with the California pop/rock sounds coming out of Los Angeles during this time period.

Obviously, the Beatles are not considered a Sunshine Pop band.  However, the Fab Four did record similar types of songs during their career.  Two examples that come to my mind are George Harrison’s, “Here Comes the Sun” from the Abbey Road album and the 1967 Baroque Pop masterpiece from Paul McCartney, “Penny Lane.”

One other major influence of Sunshine Pop is the Brian Wilson produced album, “Pet Sounds” by the Beach Boys.  Rolling Stone magazine ranks Wilson’s 1966 project as the number one, “greatest rock album of all time.” The album incorporates rock, pop, and jazz with vocal harmonies and is considered a template for the genre of Progressive Rock.  “God Only Knows” is a gem from the superb album.

The peak for the first wave of Sunshine Pop happened during the “Summer of Love” in 1967.  Young people flocked by the thousands to the San Francisco, California neighborhood of Haight-Ashbury, searching for peace, love and tranquility. Music played a huge part of this cultural revolution. 

During the spring of 1967, John Phillips wrote and produced a song called, “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)” that his friend Scott McKenzie recorded as a single. The song immediately became a Top 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 and was an inspiration for those creating Sunshine Pop music in the 60s.

While I was researching information for this topic, I found that there were 12 core bands or groups that are associated with Sunshine Pop of the 60s decade:

  • The Association
  • The Beach Boys
  • The Buckinghams
  • The Cowsills
  • Gary Lewis & the Playboys
  • Harpers Bizarre
  • The Mamas & the Papas
  • The Monkees
  • Spanky and Our Gang
  • Strawberry Alarm Clock
  • The Turtles
  • The Rascals
The back cover of “Pet Sounds” album by the Beach Boys. This photo of my vinyl record, was a 2016 Father’s Day gift to me, by my daughters Amy, Stephanie and Julianne.

Of the 12 artists listed above, many of them recorded more than just Sunshine Pop songs.  There is much musical diversity among these top pop/rock performers.

There are also 6 lesser-known Sunshine Pop bands and groups from this time period.  These artists tended to have regional hits and didn’t chart high enough on Billboard or Cash Box music charts to become major hits on Top 40 radio during the 60s.

  • The Peppermint Rainbow
  • Yellow Balloon
  • The Sunshine Company
  • The Parade
  • Sagittarius
  • The Cherry People

There are also two other artists and songs that I want to highlight, which are actually Baroque Pop but sound similar to 60s Sunshine Pop:

  • Pretty Ballerina—The Left Banke
  • 98.6—Keith featuring the Tokens

Before starting the countdown of my 25 best Sunshine Pop singles of the 60s, I want to share information on how I determined my top songs in this category.

With this article about Sunshine Pop, I am including only American artists who had major hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart between 1965 and 1969. Every song on my countdown peaked at least at number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100.  Eleven tunes peaked at number one.

As I surveyed all the top 40 Sunshine Pop hits from the 60s, I found 25 high quality singles that are on my countdown. These are songs that I deem to be culturally, historically, aesthetically significant, meaningful or relevant.

Photo of my vinyl copy of “Pet Sounds” by the Beach Boys.

I submit to you, my top 25 best Sunshine Pop singles.  As Casey Kasem used to say on his weekly American Top 40 show: “Now on with the countdown.”

25. Sunday Will Never Be the Same—Spanky & Our Gang

Peaked at #9 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Debut single by band. Lead vocals by Elaine “Spanky” McFarlane.  First of two songs on Top 25 countdown.

24. I Saw Her Again—The Mamas & the Papas

Peaked at # 5 Billboard Hot 100: 1966

Song co-written John Phillips and Denny Doherty. Third consecutive Top 5 hit for the group. It is the first of three songs on the countdown.

23.  Grazing in the Grass—The Friends of Distinction

Peaked at #3 Billboard Hot 100: 1969

Vocal remake of South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela’s 1968 instrumental hit. Harry Elston of the group wrote lyrics for the song that repeatedly ask, “Can you dig it?”

22.  Green Grass—Gary Lewis & the Playboys

Peaked at #8 Billboard Hot 100: 1966

Gary Lewis is son of actor/comedian Jerry Lewis. Song was the last of the band’s seven consecutive Top 10 hits.

21.  Good Morning Starshine—Oliver

Peaked at #3 Billboard Hot 100: 1969

Oliver covered a song from the Broadway rock musical “Hair.”  It was the first of two Top 3 hits in 1969 for the singer.

20.  Kind of a Drag—The Buckinghams

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Band from Chicago, Illinois. Song was first of 3 consecutive top 10 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 during 1967.

19.  Up–Up & Away—The 5th Dimension

Peaked at #7 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Written by Jimmy Webb. First Top 10 hit by the vocal quartet. Won 6 Grammy Awards, including Record of the Year and Song of the Year.

18.  Windy—The Association

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

First of 3 Association songs on countdown. Second number 1 song for the group. 4th biggest record of 1967.

17.  Monday Monday—The Mamas & the Papas

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1966

Only number 1 song for the vocalists. First song to top the Billboard Hot 100 by a mixed gender group. Second of three songs on the countdown.

16.   Good Vibrations—The Beach Boys

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1966

First of two Beach Boys songs on countdown. Inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. Is the 6th biggest song on the Rolling Stone “500 Greatest Songs of all Time” list.

15.  The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feeling Groovy)—Harpers Bizarre

Peaked at #13 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Written by Paul Simon. Harpers Bizarre band from Santa Cruz, California. Song was the biggest hit for the group.

14.  Lazy Day—Spanky & Our Gang

Peaked at #14 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Third single from debut “Spanky and Our Gang” album. Group performed song on the Ed Sullivan Show. Second song in the countdown.

13.  Incense & Peppermint—Strawberry Alarm Clock

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Los Angeles, California band. Highest charting single for group. 23rd biggest record for 1967.

12.  Groovin’—The Young Rascals

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

First number 1 hit for New Jersey formed band. Song is in both the Grammy Hall of Fame and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s “500 Songs that Shaped Rock & Roll.”  

11.  Cherish—The Association

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1966

Second of 3 Association songs on countdown. First number 1 song for vocal group. Second biggest record of 1966.

10.  Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In—The 5th Dimension

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1969

A medley of two songs from the Broadway rock musical “Hair.” Second biggest record of 1969. Ranked number 66 on Billboard’s “Greatest Songs of all time” chart.

9.   Summer in the City—Lovin’ Spoonful

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1966

First of two songs on the countdown. Only number 1 record for band. 11th biggest song of 1966. Ranked at 401 on Rolling Stones’ “500 Greatest Songs of all Time” listing.

8.  Happy Together—The Turtles

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Only number 1 hit for the band. Mark Volman and Howard Kaylan formed a duo called “Flo and Eddie” after breakup of the Turtles. Song is in the Grammy Hall of Fame.

7.  Daydream Believer—The Monkees

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Song written by John Stewart. Last number 1 hit by the band. Davy Jones of the group sings lead vocals on the track.

6.  The Rain, The Park & Other Things—The Cowsills

Peaked at #2 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Debut smash for Newport, Rhode Island family band. Sold 3 million records. Ties the song “Hair” as the Cowsills’ two biggest hits.

5.  Never My Love—The Association

Peaked at #2 Billboard Hot 100: 1967

Third Association song on countdown. Popular wedding song over the past 54 years. Second most played song on radio and TV during the 20th century according to BMI.

4.   A Beautiful Morning—The Rascals

Peaked at #3 Billboard Hot 100: 1968

Second song on the countdown. 3rd biggest song for the band. Came in at number 35 on the Billboard Top 100 records for 1968.

3. California Dreamin’—The Mamas & the Papas

Peaked at #4 Billboard Hot 100: 1966

Rolling Stone ranks single at number 89 on their “500 Greatest Songs of all Time” listing. Inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame during 2001. “California Dreamin’” is the signature song for the Mamas and the Papas.

2.  Do You Believe in Magic—The Lovin’ Spoonful

Peaked at #9 Billboard Hot 100: 1965

Written by band member John Sabastian. Second selection on countdown.  Rolling Stone ranks song at 216 on their “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” chart.  “Do You Believe in Magic” was the first of 7 consecutive top ten hits for the Lovin’ Spoonful from 1965 through 1967.

1.  Wouldn’t It Be Nice—The Beach Boys

Peaked at #8 Billboard Hot 100: 1966

One of the greatest doubled-sided 45 rpm singles of all time. B-side “God Only Knows.” Brian Wilson’s masterpiece uses the “Wall of Sound” production technique and 18 different instruments played on the track.  The song is considered ground-breaking and influential for future sub-genres of rock music: Power pop and progressive pop.

Pitchfork ranks Wilson’s gem at number 7 on their “200 Best Songs of the 1960s” listing.  Without any doubt, “Wouldn’t It Be Nice” is my number 1 best Sunshine Pop song of the 60s.

Now that I have humbly submitted my thoughts on the best Sunshine Pop singles from the 60s, I am curious to find out your opinion on the music from that year.

Obviously, I do not want to come across as authoritative with my critique of Sunshine Pop. The songs that you might feel are the best, may be completely different from my selections.

I am asking for your opinion: What do you consider to be the best Sunshine Pop singles of the 60s decade? There are no right or wrong answers. I welcome your thoughts.

Album cover of Chartbusters USA Special Edition: Sunshine Pop

Listening to Sunshine Pop from the golden age of Top 40 radio will always have a special place in my heart.  I cherish and fondly remember all of the wonderful Sunshine Pop songs from my youth.  Rock on!

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Broadcasting, Music, Music Countdowns, Radio, Retro Rock

1969: Best One Hit Wonders

Photo Above by Julianne Woodson

It appears that folks can’t get enough of the topic “one hit wonders.”

The published music blog that I wrote on “1970: Greatest Year for One Hit Wonders” is my most viewed message of all time.  Following in those footsteps, is the recent success of the “1971: Superb One Hit Wonders” message that is soaring in popularity.

Now I am going for the troika:  1969 one hit wonders.

From my music collection of 45 rpm singles: “Good Old Rock ‘N Roll” by Cat Mother & the All Night News Boys and “You, I” by the Rugbys.

With this edition of my musical musings, I am concentrating on the best “one hit wonders” of 1969.  I will be counting down the top songs in this category from 52 years ago.

I have fond memories listening to Top 40 radio during 1969. I turned 14 that year living in Roanoke, Virginia. During daytime hours, I was a regular listener to a couple of local AM radio stations:  WROV and WBLU.

Legendary Top 40 WROV 1240 AM was the top-rated radio station in Roanoke. The DJs that I remember from the station during 1969 include Jack Fisher, Fred Frelantz, Bart Prater and John Cigna.

WROV Roanoke Super Summer Survey 8/24/69. Courtesy of the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett.

WBLU 1480 AM Salem was the other Top 40 outlet in the Roanoke radio market.  WBLU DJ’s 52 years ago were Chris Shannon, Les Turpin and Bill Cassidy, while Dave Moran was the general manager of the station.

At sundown, WROV reduced their power and WBLU signed off the air, so I tuned in radio stations located hundreds of miles away from my Virginia home. Since radio waves changed on a nightly basis, I would listen to a variety of 50,000-watt, clear channel AM stations on any given night.

The two main stations that I listened to during the nighttime were WLS 890 AM Chicago and WABC 770 AM New York. On the Big 89 WLS, Larry Lujack, Chuck Buell and Kris Erik Stevens were my favorite DJs. When listening to WABC, Dan Ingram and Cousin Brucie (Bruce Morrow) are the two radio DJ voices that I remember.

WLS Chicago Hit Parade Surveys 7/14/69 (“In the Year 2525” is #1) & 12/1/69 (“Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye is #1).  Courtesy of Pete Battistini: Author of AMERICAN TOP 40 WITH CASEY KASEM (THE 1970’S).

On nights that WLS or WABC were hard to pick up, I had other clear channel stations that I listened to after dark. Among those other stations: WOWO Fort Wayne, WCFL Chicago 1000 AM, CKLW Windsor, Ontario (Detroit) 800 AM, WKBW Buffalo 1520 AM and WKYC Cleveland 1100 AM.

Because of my love of listening to Top 40 radio during 1969, I set a goal that year of wanting to work as a DJ when I reached adulthood. My desire to work in radio became a reality for me at age 18, when I landed a remote engineer position with WROV Roanoke during 1974.

From my music collection of 45 rpm singles: “In the Year 2525” by Zager & Evans and “Israelites” by Desmond Dekker & the Aces.

What exactly is a “One Hit Wonder?” The basic definition: An artist has only one hit song during their career on the national Billboard Hot 100 pop chart. This music blog message pertains solely to hit songs within the United States.

To avoid any confusion, here are the criteria that I am using to define a “one hit wonder”:

  • No other songs from an artist ever peaking at number 40 or higher on the Billboard National Pop Chart. (Chart positions from number 40 to number 1).
  • One hit wonders vary from country to country. An artist may have just one hit in the United States but may have multiple hits in another country.
  • Regional hits are not taken into account: A second song must be a national hit and chart within the Billboard Top 40 pop survey.
  • Any songs peaking outside of the Top 40, are always excluded for consideration.
  • Songs that peak from numbers 41 through 100 on the national Billboard Hot 100 pop chart are never considered as second hits.

From my music collection of 45 rpm singles: “Worst That Could Happen” by Brooklyn Bridge and “Smile a Little Smile For Me” by The Flying Machine.

WROV Roanoke Survey June 29, 1969. Courtesy of the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett.

The rule that a second song must be a Top 40 Billboard National pop chart hit was established in 1998, by music historian Wayne Jancik in his definitive work on the subject, “The Billboard Book of One-Hit Wonders.”

The subject of “one hit wonders” has always been interesting to me: Leading me to research the reasons why some artists have only one hit song. Way before the advent of the Internet, my go to reference for this subject has been “The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits” by Joel Whitburn. I consider Whitburn’s book to be the “bible” of Top 40 music reference and still proudly own a hard copy of this excellent book.

Before I start my “one hit wonder” countdown, I am listing the 15 biggest songs of 1969 according to Billboard Magazine. NONE OF THE FIFTEEN SONGS LISTED BELOW ARE ONE HIT WONDERS.

1          “Sugar, Sugar” The Archies

2          “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In”  The 5th Dimension

3          “I Can’t Get Next to You”  The Temptations

4          “Honky Tonk Women”  The Rolling Stones

5          “Everyday People”  Sly and the Family Stone

6          “Dizzy” Tommy Roe

7          “Hot Fun in the Summertime”  Sly and the Family Stone

8          “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again” Tom Jones

9          “Build Me Up Buttercup”  The Foundations

10        “Crimson and Clover” Tommy James and the Shondells

11        “One”  Three Dog Night

12        “Crystal Blue Persuasion”  Tommy James and the Shondells

13        “Hair”  The Cowsills

14        “Too Busy Thinking About My Baby” Marvin Gaye

15        “Love Theme from Romeo and Juliet”  Henry Mancini

From my music collection of 45 rpm singles: “More Today Than Yesterday” by Spiral Starecase and “My Pledge of Love” by the Joe Jeffrey Group.

As I surveyed all the top 40 hits from 1969, I found 25 high quality singles that are on my countdown of one hit wonders for that year.  These are songs that I deem to be culturally, historically, aesthetically significant, meaningful or relevant.

I submit to you, my top 25 best one hit wonder songs from 1969.  As Casey Kasem used to say on his weekly American Top 40 show: “Now on with the countdown.”

From my music collection of 45 rpm singles: “When I Die” by Motherlode & “Jesus is a Soul Man” by Lawrence Reynolds. I bought both records during the fall of 1969.

25.  Jesus is a Soul Man—Lawrence Reynolds

Peak Position on the Billboard Hot 100:  #28

Lawrence Taylor was a country singer.  Crossed over to Top 40 radio with a gospel song.

24.  Morning Girl—The Neon Philharmonic

Peak Position on the Billboard Hot 100: #17

Psychedelic pop band led by conductor Tupper Saussy and singer Don Gant.  Song featured the Nashville Symphony Orchestra.

23.  Sugar on Sunday—The Clique

Peak Position on the Billboard Hot 100:  #22

Sunshine pop band from Beaumont, Texas.  Song Written by Tommy James.

22.  In the Year 2525—Zager & Evans

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #1, Hot 100:  26th Biggest Hit of 1969

Nebraska folk rock duo. Apocalyptic message.  Peaked at number one: Group never had another song crack the Billboard Hot 100 again.

21.  Israelites—Desmond Dekker & the Aces

Peak Position on Billboard Chart:  #9 Hot 100

Desmond Dekker was a Jamaican ska/reggae singer-songwriter.  Among the first reggae songs to reach the top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100.

20.  Tracy—The Cuff Links

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  # 9, Hot 100:  81st Biggest Hit 1969

Pop rock studio band. Vocals on “Tracy” were by Ron Dante. He also was the lead singer on the song “Sugar, Sugar” by the fictitious group called the Archies.  Both songs spent 3 simultaneous weeks inside the top 10 of the Billboard Hot 100 chart, during October 1969.

19.  Good Old Rock & Roll—Cat Mother & the All Night News Boys

Peak Position on Billboard Chart   #21 Hot 100

Cat Mother & band covers snippets of these 50s hits: “Sweet Little Sixteen”  Chuck Berry, “Long Tall Sally” Little Richard, “Chantilly Lace”  The Big Bopper, “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On”  Jerry Lee Lewis, “Blue Suede Shoes”  Carl Perkins, and “Party Doll”  Buddy Knox.

18.  Gimme Gimme Good Lovin’—Crazy Elephant

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #12 Hot 100, 89th Biggest Hit 1969

Crazy Elephant was a studio group of musicians created by bubble gum music pioneers Jerry Kasenetz and Jeffry Katz.  The tune falls into the category of Frat Rock.

17.  When I Die—Motherlode

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts.  #18, Hot 100. 71st Biggest Hit 1969

Canadian pop rock band from London, Ontario.  Song should not be confused with another fall of ’69 hit: “And When I Die” from Blood Sweat & Tears.

16.  You, I—The Rugbys

Peak Position on Billboard Chart:  #24 Hot 100

Psychedelic hard rock band from Louisville, Kentucky.  Toured with the James Gang, Bob Seger and Grand Funk Railroad before disbanding the early 70s.

15.  Baby It’s You—Smith

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #5 Hot 100, 34th Biggest Hit 1969

“Baby It’s You” was originally recorded by the Shirelles and the Beatles.  Smith’s lead singer Gayle McCormick provides a soulful vocal performance on this blues rock cover.

14.  Did You See Her Eyes—The Illusion

Peak Position on Billboard Chart:   #32 Hot 100

Long Island, New York psychedelic-driving hard rock band.  The Illusion opened up for the Who, Chicago, Jimi Hendrix Experience and the Allman Brothers during the band’s active years.

13.  Birthday—Underground Sunshine

Peak Position on Billboard Chart:  #26 Hot 100

“Birthday” was a cover song from the 1968 Beatles’ “White Album.”  Underground Sunshine was a pop/psychedelic rock band from Montello, Wisconsin.

12.  Hot Smoke & Sassafras—The Bubble Puppy

Peak Position on the Billboard Chart:   #12, Hot 100

Biggest psychedelic rock single of 1969 was “Hot Smoke & Sassafras.”  The Bubble Puppy formed in San Antonio during 1966 and rocks hard on this psychedelia masterpiece.

11.  My Pledge of Love—Joe Jeffrey Group

Peak Position on the Billboard Chart:  #14, Hot 100

Joe Jeffrey and his group were a R&B group from Cleveland, Ohio.  “My Pledge of Love” was a top 10 hit in Canada.

10.  Color Him Father—The Winstons

Peak Positions on the Billboard Charts:  #7 Hot 100, 65th Biggest hit 1969

The Winstons were an unrelated ensemble of guys, who performed soul music.  Their hit “Color Him Father” won a Grammy Award for the “Best Rhythm and Blues Song” fifty-two years ago.

9.    More Today Than Yesterday—Spiral Starecase

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #12 Hot 100,  50th Biggest Hit 1969

Sunshine pop song featuring excellent saxophone.  Band from Sacramento, California known for its horn section.

8.    The Worst That Could Happen—The Brooklyn Bridge

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #3 Hot 100, 74th Biggest Hit 1969

Song written by Jimmy Webb.  Johnny Maestro lead singer of Brooklyn Bridge. A portion of Mendelssohn’s “Wedding March” is played towards end of the tune.

7.    Black Pearl—Sonny Charles & the Checkmates, Ltd.

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #13 Hot 100,  #66 Biggest Hit 1969

R&B group from Fort Wayne, Indiana and “Black Pearl” was produced by Phil Spector.  Sonny Charles has lead vocals with Checkmates summer hit.

6.    Polk Salad Annie—Tony Joe White

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #8 Hot 100, 77th Biggest Hit 1969

Nicknamed “The Swamp Fox” in his native Louisiana state, Tony Joe White is best known for the genre of music called Swamp Rock. White wrote “Polk Salad Annie” and “Rainy Night in Georgia” which was a top 10 hit for Brook Benton during 1970.

5.    Smile a Little Smile for Me—The Flying Machine

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #5 Hot 100, 76th Biggest Hit 1969

Flying Machine was a British pop group.  Their only hit is a soft rock ballad about unrequited love. The band broke up in 1970.

4.    Love (Can Make You Happy)—Mercy

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #2 Hot 100, 42nd Biggest Hit 1969

The American pop group Mercy came from Florida.  “Love (Can Make You Happy)” was written by band member Jack Sigler, Jr. It features tight harmonies on this melodic soft rock tune.

3.    Get Together—The Youngbloods

Peak positions on the Billboard Charts:  #5 Hot 100, #16 Biggest Hit 1969

 The Youngbloods lead by Jesse Colin Young, recorded one of the best peace songs of the 20th century with “Get Together.”   Originally released as a single in 1967, the song became a hit two years later during the summer of 1969.

2.    I Got a Line on You—Spirit

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #25 Hot 100

Formed in Los Angeles, California, Spirit was an underrated band. Combining psychedelic/hard rock with jazz, this group was a pioneer in what became known as progressive rock. “I Got a Line on You” was written by Spirit member Randy California and Jay Ferguson handles vocals on the song. This toe-tapping tune is my second favorite 1969 one hit wonder.

  1. Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye—Steam

Peak Position on Billboard Chart:  #1 Hot 100

“Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” was written by Paul Leka, Gary DeCarlo and Dale Frashuer in the early 60s.  In 1968, DeCarlo recorded 4 singles for Mercury Records as a solo artist.  One of those singles needed a B-side so DeCarlo brought Leka and Frashuer into the studio to record “Kiss Him Goodbye.”

The trio didn’t have a group name for their newly recorded song, so they came up with the fictitious band they named “Steam.”  “Kiss Him Goodbye” spent two weeks at number 1 during December 1969 and was still a top ten record on the Billboard Hot 100 during January 1970.

My 45 rpm single of “Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye” that I bought in 1969 and still own in 2021.

The popularity of “Na Na Hey Hey” has remained strong since the song was first a hit. The song is regularly heard at many professional, college and high school sporting events during the 21st Century.  There is an excellent chance to hear (Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye) at just about any type of sporting contest conducted in 2021.

Without a doubt, “Na Na Hey Hey (Kiss Him Goodbye)” is the best one hit wonder of 1969.

Now that I have humbly submitted my thoughts on “one hit wonders” of 1969, I am curious to find out your opinion on the music from that year.

Obviously, I do not want to come across as authoritative with my critique of the “one hit wonder” songs from 1969. The songs that you might feel are the best, maybe be completely different from my selections.

From my music collection of 45 rpm singles: “Get Together” by the Youngbloods & “Love (Can Make You Happy)” by Mercy.

I am asking for your opinion: What do you consider to be the best “one hit wonders” of 52 years ago? There are no right or wrong answers. I welcome your thoughts.

Listening to music from the golden age of Top 40 radio will always have a special place in my heart.  I cherish and fondly remember my favorite “one hit wonders” of 1969.  Rock on!

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Broadcasting, Music, Music Countdowns, Radio, Retro Rock

Motown Magic Detroit Years: 20 Best Artists and Songs 1961-1971

Photo above by Julianne Woodson

What are the best songs of all time from the Detroit years of Motown Records?  If I asked 100 random people that question, I would come up with one hundred different responses. Obviously, there are no definitive answers with that type of inquiry.

My latest music blog message came after I read an article from USA Today online on 2/9/21, called “Motown hits: The 50 best and essential songs. This piece was a reprint of a story from the Detroit Free Press by Brian McCollum.

From my music collection: Diana Ross & the Supremes Greatest Hits vinyl record album.

In 2016, pop music critic Brian McCollum of the Detroit Free Press, published a Top 10 listing of Motown best songs from Motown’s Detroit era (1959-1972), as selected by the newspaper and its readers to commemorate the label’s 55th anniversary.

1. “What’s Going On,” Marvin Gaye

2. “Dancing in the Street,” Martha and the Vandellas

3. “My Girl,” the Temptations

4. “The Tracks of My Tears,” the Miracles

5. “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough,” Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell

6. “Stop! In the Name of Love,” the Supremes

7. “Signed Sealed Delivered I’m Yours,” Stevie Wonder

8. “I Heard it Through the Grapevine,” Marvin Gaye

9. “I Heard it Through the Grapevine,” Gladys Knight & the Pips

10. “War,” Edwin Starr

From my music collection: 45 rpm single of “The Tears of a Crown” by Smokey Robinson & the Miracles.

Another Top 10 listing of greatest Motown songs of all-time is from Digital Dream Door Dot COM below:

  1. I Heard It Through the Grapevine–Marvin Gaye

2. My Girl–The Temptations

3. Reach Out I’ll Be There–The Four Tops

4. Where Did Our Love Go?–The Supremes

5. What’s Going On–Marvin Gaye

6. Dancing in the Street–Martha & the Vandellas

7. I Want You Back–Jackson 5

8. Superstition–Stevie Wonder

9. Please Mr. Postman–Marvelettes

10. My Guy–Mary Wells

While there isn’t anything wrong with either of the above lists, I prefer that a Top 10 best Motown songs of all-time listing be more inclusive, listing ten different artists, instead of being dominated by a single artist such as Marvin Gaye.

What do I consider to be the best Motown songs from the early days?  You probably have guessed already that I have come up with my own listing of greatest Motown singles.

From my music collection: The Best of the Four Tops CD

I will be counting down my top 20 top Motown artists and songs. Before I share my selections, I want to give a brief history of Motown Records from the Detroit years (1959-1972).

Barry Gordy Jr. founded the company during 1959 which was known then as Tamla Records.  The name Motown was incorporated the next year in 1960, and was a tribute to Detroit, which was known as “Motor City” due to it being the auto manufacturing capital of America.

Motown helped to define “Soul Music” during the early 60s, with Black artists crossing over to audiences on Top 40 radio.  From 1961 to 1971, Motown had 110 top 10 hits on the Billboard Hot 100.

From my music collection: Jackson 5 Greatest Hits vinyl record album.

Songs of note during the first years of Motown:  The Miracles “Shop Around” was the first crossover hit for Tamla Records during 1960 and reached number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100. A year later, Motown had its first number 1 record on the Billboard chart with “Please Mr. Postman” by the Marvelettes.

In addition to the Tamla name, there were a number of other sub record labels that were distributed under the Motown banner.  Gordy, Soul, Rare Earth and V.I.P. were other prominent sub recording labels associated with Motown music during the Detroit years.

The showcasing of vocal talent for Motown songs was enhanced by a group of session musicians based out of Detroit: The Funk Brothers. These instrumentalists are credited with playing on a majority of Motown hit songs between 1959 and 1972. The excellent musicianship of the Funk Brothers helped to create “Motown Magic.”

From my music collection: 45 rpm singles “I Know (I’m Losing You)” from the Temptations & Rare Earth

For this music blog message, I will countdown what I consider to be the best 20 Motown songs by 20 different artists.  Here are the rules and criteria that I set forth for this musical exercise:

  • I have selected 20 different songs by 20 artists.
  • Of the 20 artists, only Marvin Gaye has two songs. (first a duet with female singer and the second a solo song).
  • Only Motown artists are listed. That means superb soul artists like Aretha Franklin, James Brown, Otis Redding and Sam Cooke are not included on my countdown.
  • I deem each of my selections to be culturally, historically, aesthetically significant, meaningful or relevant. 
  • All 20 songs are among my favorites from the time period of 1961-1971.

My reference for chart performances of the 20 songs on the countdown comes from “The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits” by Joel Whitburn.  Way before the advent of the Internet, Whitburn’s book has been my main reference guide and I consider it to be the “bible” for Top 40 music information.  I still proudly still own a hard copy of this excellent book here in 2021.

And as Casey Kasem used to say on his American Top 40 weekly broadcasts, on with the countdown:

20.  Please Mr. Postman—The Marvelettes  1961

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #1 Hot 100, #1 R&B.

First crossover number 1 song for Motown.  On Billboard Hot 100: December 1961.

Marvin Gaye played drums on tune. The Beatles and the Carpenters both had notable cover versions of the song.

19.  My Guy—Mary Wells. 1964

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #1 Hot 100, #1 R&B, 7th Biggest Songs of 1964

Written and produced by Smokey Robinson. First Motown female solo singer to reach number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. Biggest hit song during the career for Mary Wells.

18.  It’s a Shame—The Spinners. 1970

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #14 Hot 100, #3 R&B, 76th Biggest Hit of 1970

Biggest charting song for Spinners on Motown label.  Co-written by Stevie Wonder, Syreeta Wright and Lee Garrett.  Group went on to have 14 Top 40 hits. Billboard Hot 100 between 1972 and 1980.

17.  My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)—David Ruffin  1969

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #9 Hot 100, #2 R&B, 97th Biggest Song of 1969

David Ruffin was a former member of the Temptations.  First hit as a solo artist.  The song with its melody and intro is based upon the classical music piece “Frühlingslied” by Felix Mendelssohn.

16.  War—Edwin Starr. 1970

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #1 Hot 100, #3 R&B, 5th Biggest Song of 1970

One of the best anti-war protest songs from the 20th Century.  Edwin Starr earned a Grammy nomination for “War” in 1971.  The song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame during 1999.

15.  I Just Want to Celebrate—Rare Earth. 1971

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #7 Hot 100, #30 R&B, 66th Biggest Song of 1971

Blue eyed soul. Rare Earth was the first all-white rock band signed to Motown.  Barry Gordy created a subsidiary label called Rare Earth Records for the band.  Had three Top 10 hits on Billboard Hot 100 during 1970 and 1971.

From my music collection: 45 rpm single of “I Just Want To Celebrate” by Rare Earth

14.  What Does It Take (To Win Your Love)—Jr. Walker and the All Stars. 1969

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #4 Hot 100, #1 R&B, #20 Biggest Songs of 1969

Excellent tenor saxophone solos and vocals by Junior Walker. Other instrumentation by the All-Stars with members of The Funk Brothers and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Last Top 10 hit for this Motown band.

From my music collection: 45 rpm single of “What Does It Take (To Win Your Love)” by Jr. Walker & the All Stars.

13.  Smiling Faces Sometimes—The Undisputed Truth. 1971

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #2 R&B, #3 Hot 100:  14th biggest hit of 1971

Psychedelic soul trio consisting of Joe Harris, Billie Calvin and Brenda Evans. The lyrics of the song are about “back stabbing” friends and the consequences of those actions.  The Funk Brothers session band provides outstanding musicianship and the singers maintains excellent harmonies on this melodic tune.

From my music collection: The Undisputed Truth CD with song “Smiling Faces Sometimes.”

12.  What Becomes of the Broken Hearted—Jimmy Ruffin. 1966

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:   #6 B&B, #7 Hot 100

Jimmy Ruffin was the older brother of the Temptations lead-singer David Ruffin.  One of Motown’s most enduring songs from the 60s.  Was Jimmy Ruffin’s biggest record during his career.

11.  This Old Heart of Mine (Is Weak for You)—The Isley Brothers. 1966

Peak Position on Billboard Charts: #6 R&B, #12 Hot 100,  98th biggest song of 1966

The Isley Brothers only major hit while on the Motown label. Group went on to have 9 Top 40 hits between 1969 and 1980.  Rod Stewart and Ronald Isley peaked at number 10 on Billboard Hot 100 in 1990, with a cover of this classic Motown song.

10.   Dancing in the Street—Martha and the Vandellas. 1964

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #2 Hot 100, 17th biggest song of 1964. 

Rolling Stone magazine ranks this Motown tune as the “Best Summer Song of all Time.”  The song also is considered by some as a civil rights anthem. Martha Reeves invites listeners where ever they may live, to celebrate, have a good time and to “Dance in the Street.”

9.     I Heard It Through the Grapevine—Gladys Knight and the Pips 1967

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #1 R&B, #2 Hot 100

As a response to Aretha Franklin’s song “Respect”, Gladys Knight used the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section to record a funk version of “I Heard It Through the Grapevine.”  Knight’s number 2 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 happened a year before Marvin Gaye’s 1968 number one smash cover of “Grapevine.” The song is a true Motown soul classic!

8.     Bernadette—The Four Tops. 1967

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #3 R&B, #4 Hot 100, 82nd biggest song of 1967

 One of Motown’s greatest bass lines is found on this song.  Levi Stubbs provides outstanding vocals on the Four Tops last top 10 hit of the 60s. A false ending and Stubbs shouting “Bernadette” creates a memorable lasting impression on this wonderful tune.

7.     The Tracks of My Tears—Smokey Robinson and the Miracles 1965

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #2 R&B, #16 Hot 100. 78th biggest songs of 1965

 Co-written by Smokey Robinson, Pete Moore, and Marv Tarplin, “The Tracks of My Tears” is among the most decorated songs in Motown history. The song has been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame and is considered one of the greatest songs of the 20th Century.

6.     Stop! In the Name of Love—The Supremes 1965

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #1 Hot 100, #2 R&B. 20th biggest songs of 1965

The Supremes are the most successful Motown artist of all time. The trio of Diana Ross, Mary Wilson and Florence Ballad were golden with their vocal harmonies on this hit. “Stop! In the Name of Love” was the 4th of 5 consecutive number 1 songs for America’s top girl group during 1964 and 1965.

5.     I Want You Back—The Jackson 5. 1969/1970

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #1 Hot 100, #1 R&B, 28th biggest songs of 1970.

Debut single from the Gary, Indiana Jackson family. It was the first of four consecutive singles to reach number 1 on Billboard Hot 100 during 1970.  “I Want You Back” is known for the killer bass line played by Wilton Felder. Many music critics proclaim the tune has one of the greatest chord progressions in pop music history.

4.     Signed, Sealed, Delivered, I’m Yours—Stevie Wonder. 1970

Peak Position Billboard Charts:  #1R&B, #3 Hot 100 31st biggest songs of 1970

Opening up this pleasing toe-tapping tune is the distinctive sitar riff performed by Eddie Willis. Stevie Wonder produced his own song, and it was his first composition to feature 3 female backup singers. It was the beginning of Wonder’s influence as a musical pioneering maestro during the 70s decade.

3.     What’s Going On—Marvin Gaye. 1971

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #1 R&B, #2 Hot 100, 21st biggest song of 1971

1971 was a troublesome time in America.  Marvin Gaye’s socially conscious song “What’s Going On” accurately captured the pulse of turmoil that prevailed in our country.  The message was relevant 50 years ago. Unfortunately, the issues of this song still hold true in 2021. 

“What’s Going On” is among the best and most loved tunes in Motown musical history. Rolling Stone ranks it at number 4 on their, “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” listing.  Numerous other music publications place the tune among the best songs from the 20th Century. The “What’s Going On” single remains a crown jewel with Marvin Gaye’s solo discography projects.

From my music collection: CD cover of “What’s Going On” by Marvin Gaye.

2.     Ain’t No Mountain High Enough—Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell  1967

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #3 R&B, #19 Hot 100, 87th biggest song of 1967

Coming in at number 2 on my countdown, is what I consider to be the best Motown duet of all time:  “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” by Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell. With instrumentation by the Funk Brothers and Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the Terrell/Gaye duo have a perfect pop song.

The song was written by Nickolas Ashford & Valerie Simpson, and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. Although Diana Ross’ cover version of Ashford/Simpson’s song was a number 1 crossover hit during 1970, I prefer the rich vocal harmonies of Terrell and Gaye’s original. 

Whenever I need a Motown music fix, “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” by Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell is excellent medicine for my listening pleasure.

1.     My Girl—The Temptations  1965

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:   #1 Hot 100, #1 R&B,  10th biggest song of 1965

Written and produced by the Miracles members Smokey Robinson and Ronald White, “My Girl” by the Temptations is my number 1 selection as “Best Motown Song” from the Detroit years.

David Ruffin was picked by Smokey Robinson to sing lead vocals on the tune, which became the first number 1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 for the Temptations. “My Girl” is now considered a signature song for the vocal group.

The Temptations song “My Girl” is one of Motown’s most successful and well-known singles.  It was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998 and placed in the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress during 2017.

Without a doubt, the feel-good pop classic by the Temptations is my favorite Motown song of all time.  “My Girl” is “Motown Magic” for me!

From my record collection: 45 rpm singles of “My Girl” and “Psychedelic Shack” by the Temptations.

Now that I have humbly submitted my thoughts on the best songs of Motown, I am curious to find out your opinion.  What do you feel are the greatest singles with the Detroit era of Motown Records? I look forward reading your comments on this topic. 

I would also challenge you to come up with your own favorite top Motown songs music list. After compiling your own listing, maybe you can create your own playlist of favorite songs with this Motown category?  On Spotify, Pandora, iTunes, Amazon or any other music platform outlet?

Photo of a Motown album sleeve from my personal record collection.

I cherish and fondly remember the music of Motown during my youth.  It was and still is magic to me. I leave you with lyrics to another legendary Motown magical song: “Sir Duke” by Stevie Wonder.  Rock on!

“Music is a world within itself

With a language we all understand

With an equal opportunity

For all to sing, dance and clap their hands

Music knows that it is and always will

Be one of the things that life just won’t quit”

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1971: Superb One Hit Wonders

Photo above by Julianne Woodson

Since the earliest days of rock and roll music during the 1950s, one hit wonders have always existed on Top 40 radio.  Artists who had one big hit and then faded into oblivion.

With this edition of my musical musings, I am concentrating on the superb “One hit wonders” of 1971.  I will be counting down the top songs in this category from 50 years ago.

What exactly is a “One Hit Wonder?” The basic definition: An artist has only one hit song during their career on the national Billboard Hot 100 pop chart. This music blog message pertains solely to hit songs within the United States.

 

Obviously, there some other rules that should be included if an artist is to be included for consideration as a one hit wonder.

  • No other songs from an artist ever peaking at number 40 or higher on the Billboard National Pop Chart. (Chart positions from number 40 to number 1).
  • One hit wonders vary from country to country. An artist may have just one hit in the United States but may have multiple hits in another country.
  • Regional hits are not taken into account: A second song must be a national hit and chart within the Billboard Top 40 pop survey.
  • Any song peaking outside of the Top 40, are always excluded for consideration.
  • Songs that peak from numbers 41 through 100 on the national Billboard Hot 100 pop chart are never considered as second hits.

The rule that a second song must be a Top 40 Billboard National pop chart hit was established in 1998, by music historian Wayne Jancik in his definitive work on the subject, “The Billboard Book of One-Hit Wonders.”

Photo of my 45 rpm single of “Here Comes the Sun” by Richie Havens. A record that I bought in the summer of 1971 and still own here in 2021.

The subject of “One hit wonders” has always been interesting to me and researching the reasons why some artists have only one hit song. Way before the advent of the Internet, my go to reference for this subject has been “The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits” by Joel Whitburn. I consider Whitburn’s book to be the “bible” of Top 40 music reference and still proudly own a hard copy of this excellent book.

I grew up in Roanoke, Virginia and have fond memories listening to Top 40 radio in 1971.

During daylight hours, I would tune into a couple of Roanoke Valley stations:  WROV 1240 AM and WBLU 1480 AM. 

WROV was the top-rated radio station in Roanoke and the DJs that I remember during this time period were Bart Prater, Larry Bly, Jack Fisher, Dan Alexander, Ron Tompkins and Phil Beckman.

WROV Roanoke DJ Jack Fisher drinking milk at remote broadcast. Photo is courtesy of the WROV History Online Website/Pat Garrett.

At sundown, WROV reduced their power and WBLU signed off the air.  I would then listen to a variety of 50,000-watt clear channel AM stations at night.

The two main stations that I listened to during the nighttime were WLS 890 AM Chicago and WABC 770 AM New York. On the Big 89 WLS, Larry Lujack, Chuck Buell, Kris Erik Stevens and Scotty Brink were my favorite DJs. When listening to WABC, Dan Ingram and Cousin Brucie (Bruce Morrow) are the two radio DJ voices that I remember from 1971.

WLS Chicago Surveys from 1/18/71 and 8/23/71. Photo is courtesy of Pete Battistini: Author of the book, American Top 40 with Casey Kasem (The 1970’s).

On nights that WLS or WABC were hard to pick up, I had other clear channel stations for my listening pleasure. Among those other stations were, WOWO Fort Wayne 1190 AM, WCFL Chicago 1000 AM, CKLW Windsor, Ontario (Detroit) 800 AM, WKBW Buffalo 1520 AM and WKYC Cleveland 1100 AM.

At the end of 1971, Billboard Magazine published the top hits of the year. Below all the Top 10 hits from that year.  All artists listed on the year-end Top 10 chart had more than one hit during their careers.

1          “Joy to the World”      Three Dog Night

2          “Maggie May”/”Reason to Believe”   Rod Stewart

3          “It’s Too Late”/”I Feel the Earth Move”          Carole King

4          “One Bad Apple”         The Osmonds

5          “How Can You Mend a Broken Heart”           Bee Gees

6          “Indian Reservation (The Lament of the Cherokee Reservation Indian)”

               Paul Revere and the Raiders                               

7          “Go Away Little Girl”   Donny Osmond

8          “Take Me Home, Country Roads”      John Denver

9          “Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)”     Temptations

10        “Knock Three Times”  Tony Orlando and Dawn 

Photo of my 45 rpm single that I bought in 1971 and still own today. “Cherish What Is Dear To You (While It’s Near To You” by Freda Payne. This artist is not a one hit wonder.

For the remainder of this message, I will be focusing on the musical year of 1971 and the numerous excellent one hit wonder songs during this golden year of Top 40 radio. 

Before I start my 1971 one hit wonders countdown, I will be sharing with you a band whom I thought only had 1 hit in America.  However, the Canadian group is a “Two Hit Wonder.”

“Sign, sign, everywhere a sign

Blockin’ out the scenery, breakin’ my mind

Do this, don’t do that, can’t you read the sign?”

True Confession:  Before I started writing this music blog message, I always assumed the song “Signs” by the Five Man Electrical Band as the best one hit wonder of 1971. However, that is erroneous information.  The Canadian rock group from Ottawa, Ontario had a second 1971 hit with “Absolutely Right” which peaked at number 26 on the Billboard Hot 100.

“Signs” peaked at number 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was the 24th biggest record for the entire year of 1971.  It’s an all-time favorite song for me and my selection as the best “Two Hit Wonder” from 50 years ago.

Besides the excellent song “Signs” and the Five Man Electrical Band, there are a few other “Two hit wonders” that I want to highlight on this message. Another Canadian band in this category are the Stampeders. Formed in Calgary, Alberta, the band reached number 8 with “Sweet City Woman.”  They had a second top 40 hit in America with, “Hit the Road Jack” during 1975.

Photos of 45 rpm singles that I own here in 2021: Both were two hit wonders. “Do You Know What I Mean” came from a jukebox, while “Sweet City Woman” is a single that I bought during the summer of 1971.

I also want to share a couple of other prominent “Two hit wonders” from 1971. American rock musician Lee Michaels hit the top 40 twice that year: “Do You Know What I Mean” reached number 6 and his follow up hit, “Can I Get a Witness” peaked at number 39. 

Welsh singer-songwriter and guitarist Dave Edmonds reached number 2 with “I Hear Your Knocking” during 1971. His song, “Slipping Away” peaked at number 39 during 1983 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Photo of my 45 rpm singles that I bought in 1971 and still own here in 2021. Both are one hit wonders.

As I evaluated the data from the Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitman, there are two outlier songs that are technically one hit wonders:  But I refuse to place either of those artists and/or their songs in that category.

  • “Me and Bobby McGee” by Janis Joplin.  This posthumous number 1 song was Joplin’s only Top 40 hit.  She did have two other solo just outside of number 40: “Kozmic Blues” reached 41 and “Cry Baby” peaked at number 42. Joplin also reached number 12 in 1968 with “Piece of My Heart” with Big Brother & Holding Company. In my humble opinion, Ms. Joplin should never be considered a one hit wonder.
  • “Chicago” by Graham Nash.   Is this really a solo song or a band hit? Peaking at number 35 on the Billboard Hot 100, “Chicago” is found on two albums:  It was released first on the Crosby Stills Nash and Young’s, “4 Way Street” album during April 1971. Then one month later, it showed up on Graham Nash’s debut solo album, “Songs For Beginners.”  With Nash having multiple hits with the Hollies and CSN&Y, he doesn’t deserve the title or status as a one hit wonder artist.

Most of the true one hit wonders from 1971 are songs that I do not mind hearing 50 years later. However, there are a couple of novelty songs in this category that I never, ever want to hear again in my life:

  •  Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep–Mac and Katie Kisson
  •  Chick-A-Boom (Don’t Ya Jes’ Love It)–Daddy Dewdrop

Before starting the countdown of my favorite Top 13 “one hit wonder” favorites, here are five singles that peaked between numbers 26 and 40:

  • I’d Love to Change the World—Ten Years After
  • Games—Redeye
  • Hallelujah—Sweat Hog
  • Resurrection Shuffle—Ashton, Gardner and Dyke
  • 1900 Yesterday—Liz Damon’s Orient Express

Now it is time for my countdown:  A baker’s dozen of what I consider to be the best one hit wonders of 1971:

13.   I’ve Found Someone on My Own—The Free Movement

Peak position on Billboard Charts:  #5 Hot 100, #7 AC

 The Free Movement was a soul/R&B ensemble from Los Angeles, California.  Their mellow soft rock hit was the 27th biggest record of 1971.

12.   Timothy—The Buoys

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #17 Hot 100:  87th biggest hit of 1971

Pop/rock band from the Wilkes-Barre-Scranton, Pennsylvania area. This controversial song written by Rupert Holmes, featured lyrics about a coal mine disaster and cannibalism. The message of the song was problematic. Nevertheless, it was still a hit.

11.    Get It On—Chase

Peak Position on Billboard Chart:  #24 Hot 100

Bill Chase formed a jazz-rock fusion band named after himself. The song “Get It On” sounds similar to what rock bands Chicago or Blood Sweat & Tears recorded during the early 70s.

10.    Funky Nassau—The Beginning of the End

Peak position on Billboard Charts:  #15 Hot 100, #7 R&B:  75th biggest hit of 1971

From Nassau, Bahamas, the Beginning of the End played a variety of musical genres:  A hybrid of Funk, R&B, Calypso, Latin, Jazz and Pop.  Band was known for their horn section.

9.      Mr. Big Stuff—Jean Knight

Peak position on Billboard Charts:  #1 R&B, #2 Hot 100:  17th biggest hit of 1971

A sassy, upbeat soul song, that has an excellent bass line. Jean Knight’s song was nominated for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance at the 1972 Grammy Awards.

8.      Here Comes the Sun—Richie Havens

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #16 Hot 100:  95th biggest hit of 1971

 1969 Woodstock singer-songwriter and guitarist Richie Havens performs a superb mid-tempo cover of this George Harrison song.  The combination of accompanied conga drum playing, along with Havens’ excellent guitar riffs, makes for an outstanding musical performance.

7.      Put Your Hand in the Hand—Ocean

Peak Position on Billboard Charts: #2 Hot 100:  33rd Biggest Hit of 1971

Originally recorded by Anne Murray, the Canadian band Ocean had an international smash with their gospel song.  “Put Your Hand in the Hand” has been covered by many artists over the years, including by Elvis Presley, Loretta Lynn, Lynn Anderson, Joan Baez and Randy Stonehill. The song was inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2006.

6.      One Toke Over the Line—Brewer and Shipley

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts: #10 Hot 100:  63rd Biggest Hit of 1971

American folk rock duo Brewer & Shipley had a contentious hit song during 1971, with lyrics mentioning Jesus and drug usage. According to Wikipedia: “U.S. Vice President Spiro Agnew, tried to get the FCC to ban the song on American radio.”  Obviously, Agnew wasn’t successful banning “One Tote Over the Line” and it can still be heard on U.S. radio here in 2021.

5.      Toast and Marmalade for Tea—Tin Tin

Peak Position on Billboard Chart:  #20 Hot 100

Maurice Gibb of the Bee Gees produced the only hit for the Australian rock band.  Tin Tin’s song features tight harmonies and starts off with a distinctive piano melody. The tune then builds by adding multiple guitars, bass, drums, brass and stringed instruments, making a pleasing crescendo at the end of the song.

4.       Rings—Cymarron

Peak Position on Billboard Charts:  #17 Hot 100, #6 AC

Cymarron was a band out of Memphis, Tennessee and they named their band after a 60’s TV show called, “Cimarron Strip.”  Lyrics to the song mentions listening to “James Taylor on the stereo” and is considered a quintessential soft rock tune of the early 70s. Tompall & the Glaser Brothers recorded a cover version of “Rings” and it reached number 7 on the Billboard County Singles Chart.  Their rendition mentions listening to “Merle Haggard on the stereo.”

3.       Woodstock—Matthews Southern Comfort

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #23 Hot 100

A song that Joni Mitchell wrote during 1969, “Woodstock” had already been a hit for Crosby Stills Nash & Young during the Spring of 1970. British country folk/rock band Matthews Southern Comfort recorded another cover of Mitchell’s anthem, and their version became a hit in 1971.  This newer version of the song featured a slower tempo and had a country/rock vibe.  Ironically, Ian Matthews left his own band before “Woodstock” became a hit in America.

2.       Wedding Song (There is Love)—Paul Stookey

Peak positions on Billboard Charts:  #3 AC, #24 Hot 100:  92nd biggest hit of 1971

Noel Paul Stookey first gain musical popularity with the folk-rock trio Peter, Paul and Mary in 1961.  Their group broke up for the first time during 1970 and Stookey’s only solo hit came the following year.  “Wedding Song (There is Love)” became a popular song played at weddings during the 70s and the tune is still performed at some marriage ceremonies nearly 50 years later.

  1.   Smiling Faces Sometimes—The Undisputed Truth

Peak Positions on Billboard Charts:  #2 R&B, #3 Hot 100:  14th biggest hit of 1971

The Undisputed Truth was a psychedelic soul/R&B Motown trio consisting of Joe Harris, Billie Calvin and Brenda Evans. The lyrics of the song are about “back stabbing” friends and the consequences of those actions.  The Funk Brothers session band provides outstanding musicianship and the trio maintains excellent harmonies on this melodic tune. Without a doubt, “Smiling Faces Sometimes” is my favorite one hit wonder from 1971.

Now that I have humbly submitted my thoughts on “one hit wonders” of 1971, I am curious to find out your opinion on the music from that year.

Obviously, I do not want to come across as authoritative with my critique of the “one hit wonder” songs from 1971. The songs that you might feel are the best, maybe be completely different from my selections.

So I am asking for your opinion: What do you consider to be the best “one hit wonders” of 50 years ago? There are no right or wrong answers. I welcome your thoughts.

Listening to music from the golden age of Top 40 radio will always have a special place in my heart.  I cherish and fondly remember my favorite “one hit wonders” of 1971.  Rock on!

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Broadcasting, Music, Music Countdowns, Radio, Retro Rock

1985: Bodacious Contemporary Hit Radio Singles

“Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes. Time may change me but I can’t trace time.”  David Bowie’s lyrics are an accurate description for me during 1985. Thirty-five years ago, I was engaged in July and then married the love of my life at the end of December.

Fast forward to December 27, 2020: The day I am publishing this message. Today is my 35th wedding anniversary with Priscilla. As I celebrate with my wife, I am thankful for our time together since 1985 and looking forward to many more years together.  Priscilla:  I love you!

The year of 1985 was also a transition year for me listening to music on radio. It was the last year that I actively listened to popular songs on a daily basis:  On multiple radio stations playing current top-rated songs or watching music videos on MTV.  My desire to keep up with American Top 40 and the latest hit songs, waned after this time period.

Lyrics for the Guess Who’s 1969 hit, “No Time” conveys my radio listening habits after 1985: “Seasons changed and so did I, you need not wonder why, there’s no time left for you.” The music being played on all-hit radio stations was slowly changing.  By the end of the 80s decade, most of the top hits on the Billboard Hot 100, were no longer pleasing to my ears.

Since 1985 is the last year that I can give a complete overview of hit music on the radio, I will be counting down what I consider to be my favorite bodacious singles from the midway point of the 80s decade.

The number 1 song of 1985 was “Careless Whispers” by Wham! I prefer the other ’85 chart-topping song by the duo: “Everything She Wants.”

Radio & Records (R&R) was a trade publication providing news and airplay information for radio stations in America. During the early 80s, R&R coined the term Contemporary Hit Radio (CHR) as a new description to the format formerly known as Top 40.  With the advent of the CHR name, most radio stations that had this format were located on the FM band.

During the early to mid 80s, I was drawn to the CHR format as I had worked in the radio industry as a young man.  My first radio position started in 1974 at Top 40 WROV 1240 AM Roanoke. After my radio career ended in 1980, I still had a keen interest with any radio station using a CHR or Top 40 hybrid format.

A framed WROV Roanoke poster that is owned by Barry Michaels: Who worked as a DJ at WROV from 1978 through 1981 and provided his photo for my music blog.

Whenever I traveled outside of my home of Roanoke, Virginia during the 80s, I would always seek out CHR/Top 40 radio stations, especially in major markets. Here are some of the CHR stations that I heard live in either 1983 and 1984, while I was on various vacations:

  • WCAU Philadelphia
  • Z100 New York
  • WPLJ New York
  • KISS 108 Boston
  • WTIC Harford
  • WPRO Providence

  • Q107 Washington
  • B104 Baltimore
  • Q94 Richmond
  • Z104 Norfork
  • KDWB Minneapolis

  • KITS San Francisco
  • KMEL San Francisco
  • KKHR Los Angeles
  • KIIS FM Los Angeles
  • B100 San Diego

K92 Roanoke DJ Staff on the cover of Roanoker Magazine. From Left: Bill Jordan, David Lee Michaels, John Berry, Larry Dowdy, Vince Miller and Russ Brown. Photo courtesy of Steve Nelson and the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett.

Radio listening was huge for me during 1985 as I was employed by Kroger Distribution Center in Roanoke County, Virginia.  My position title was Transportation Supervisor for truck dispatch activities with our third shift overnight operations.  Each night while at work, I would listen to Roanoke Valley radio stations.

On a typical night during my shift, I would listen to a couple of radio stations while executing various job duties.  My choice of radio stations was limited:  Local Roanoke AM stations had weak night signals and the building structure prohibited clear access for those radio transmissions. WXLK (K92) and WSLQ (Q99) were the two stations I listened to nightly during 1985.

Q99 had a hybrid CHR/Adult Contemporary radio format during 1985. I listened to Q99 throughout the night as they featured a live syndicated show via satellite called Nighttime America (NA).  Legendary WCFL Chicago DJ Bob Dearborn was the host of NA and is known for his complete analysis of Don McLean’s epic song, “America Pie.”  Dearborn played all of the current 1985 top hits during his live radio broadcast.

K92 Roanoke morning “K Crew” staff. Larry Dowdy, Mike Stevens and Bill Jordan inside K92 studio. Photo courtesy of Larry Dowdy.

Then at 5:00 am every morning, I would switch over my radio to K92, the leading station of the Roanoke/Lynchburg market.  The morning drive “K Crew” of Bill Jordan, Larry Dowdy and Mike Stevens was always informative, entertaining and played all the current hits.  I always enjoyed hearing the smooth presentation of DJs Jordan and Dowdy on K92, and had the pleasure of working with both guys, when we all were employed by WROV Roanoke during 1975. 

During my non-employment hours 35 years ago, I would alternate listening to WROV, K92 and Q99. My preference during daytime hours was listening to WROV and DJ Rob O’Brady:  His vocal delivery style was personal, distinctive and warm.  I also would tune in to part time WROV weekend DJs Larry Bly, Fred Frelantz and Jack Fisher during 1985.

WROV 1240 AM DJ Rob O’Brady inside the station studio. Photo courtesy of Steve Nelson and the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett.

There were also a couple of other CHR FM stations out of North Carolina that I would listen to during day time hours, as both had strong signals that came in clearly at my Roanoke home:  WKZL (107.5) Winston-Salem and G105 (105.1) Raleigh/Durham.

K92 Roanoke DJs Tripper and Larry Dowdy inside the K92 studio. My thanks to Larry Dowdy for providing his photo to be used here.

On multiple weekends in 1985, I would travel to various locations inside the state of Virginia. The top five CHR stations I heard on these trips:

  • Z104 Norfolk
  • Q94 Richmond
  • Q107 Washington (Northern Virginia)
  • WAVA Washington (Northern Virginia)
  • B106 Washington (Northern Virginia)

In June, I went on vacation with my sister Kathryn. By auto, we traveled to Canada from our Roanoke home. While Kathryn and I were in Toronto, we saw Don McLean in concert at Ontario Place amphitheater. Below are the stations I remembering hearing on this trip:

  • Wink 104 Harrisburg
  • WGCL Cleveland
  • CHUM Toronto
  • CFTR Toronto
  • B94 Pittsburgh
  • WNCI Columbus
  • WHYT Detroit

My photo capturing the rocky coast of Maine. Location is Acadia National Park.

A couple month later in August, I made a trip to Union, Maine and met my future in-laws. With my fiancé Priscilla, I heard KISS 108 Boston, plus two CHR stations in Portland and Bangor. I remember first hearing “Cherish” by Kool and the Gang when Priscilla and I traveled to Lucia Beach at Birch Point Beach State Park, to view the rocky coast of Maine.

Then on my honeymoon in Florida during the last week of December, Priscilla and I listened to Q105 Tampa and BJ105 Orlando. While in Clearwater Beach, we heard “Living in America” by James Brown for the first time on the radio.

My wife Priscilla and her pelican friend at Clearwater Beach, Florida. On our honeymoon December 1985.

For the remainder of this message, I will be focusing on what I consider to be the essential CHR songs of 1985. With my extensive knowledge and listening to numerous CHR stations 35 years ago, I have come up with a countdown with my quintessential 1985 favorite tunes.

My reference for this subject is, “The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits” by Joel Whitburn. I consider Whitburn’s book to be the “bible” of Top 40 music reference and still proudly own a hard copy of this excellent book.

Before revealing my top songs of 1985 countdown, I have tabulated 10 other songs that are favorites for me but failed to crack my Top 20 listing. These selections are not ranked and placed in a random order:

  • Walking on Sunshine—Katrina & the Waves
  • I Want to Know What Love Is—Foreigner
  • Better Be Good to Me—Tina Turner
  • Power of Love—Huey Lewis & the News
  • Summer of ’69—Bryan Adams
  • What About Love—Heart
  • Every Time You Go Away—Paul Young
  • No More Lonely Nights—Paul McCartney
  • Born in the U.S.A.–Bruce Springsteen
  • Don’t You (Forget About Me)—Simple Minds

Staring off my countdown are numbers 20 through 14. These are all excellent songs that I never get tired of hearing. As Casey Kasem used to say on his American Top 40 show,  “Now on with the countdown.”

20. Would I Lie To You?—Eurythmics

  Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #2 Rock, #5 Hot 100

Synthpop duo of Annie Lennox and David Stewart.   Rocked out changed directions. 

19. Old Man Down the Road—John Fogerty

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #1 Rock, #10 Hot 100

Lead single from Fogerty comeback album “Centerfield.”    

18. Valotte—Julian Lennon

Peak position on Billboard Charts:  #4 AC, #9 Hot 100

  John Lennon’s son. Second top 10 hit from debut album.   Melodic ballad.

17. Find a Way—Amy Grant

Peak position on Billboard Charts:  #7 AC, #29 Hot 100

  Contemporary Christian Music singer.  First crossover hit.   

16. All She Wants To Do is Dance—Don Henley

Peak position on Billboard Charts:  #1 Rock, #9 Hot 100

First of two songs on countdown. Patty Smyth and Martha Davis background singers.

15. Shout—Tears for Fears

Peak position on Billboard Charts:  #1 Hot 100, #6 Rock

One of three songs on countdown. Third consecutive top 10 smash.

14. Take on Me—A-ha 

Peak position on Billboard Charts:  #1 Hot 100, #4 AC

Norwegian synth-pop band.  Award winning video.

Baker’s Dozen:  My top 13 selections. I consider these songs as being the “cream of the crop” and all fit into the following categories: I deem the Baker’s Dozen to be culturally, historically, aesthetically significant, meaningful, relevant and absolute all-time favorite songs.

13. Money for Nothing—Dire Straits

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #1 Hot 100, #1 Rock

Sting sings on song.  Performed at Live Aid July 1985.  Won a Grammy award.

12. The Heat is On—Glenn Frey

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #2 Hot 100, #4 Rock

Featured in film Beverly Hills Cop. Up tempo rock song with saxophone.

11. Fortress Around Your Heart—Sting

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #1 Rock, #8 Hot 100

Second solo top 10 hit in 1985.   Excellent saxophone on pop/rock/jazz fusion tune.

10. Easy Lover—Phil Collins and Phillip Bailey

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #1 Black Singles, #2 Hot 100

Power duet by Bailey from Earth Wind & Fire and Genesis member Collins. MTV Music Award.   Nominated Grammy.

9.   Never Surrender—Corey Hart

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #3 Hot 100, #8 AC

     Canadian singer. Soaring power ballad anthem featuring saxophone.   

8.   Things Can Only Get Better—Howard Jones

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #5 Hot 100, #21 Rock

British singer songwriter.   Feel good sunshine pop rock song.

7.   Head Over Heels—Tears for Fears

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #3 Hot 100, #7 Rock

Second of 3 songs on my top 20 list.  Third top 10 smash of 1985.  Song segue to instrumental ending medley.

6.   Voices Carry—’Til Tuesday

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #8 Hot 100, #14 Rock

  Aimee Mann excellent vocals.  MTV Music Award Winner.  Powerful dark vocals.

5.   Alive and Kicking—Simple Minds

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #2 Rock, #3 Hot 100

Scottish rock band. Jim Kerr singer/front man. Married Chrissie Hynde of the Pretenders.

 4.   Broken Wings—Mr. Mister

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #1 Hot 100, #4 Rock

Inspired by Kahlil Gibran’s novel Broken Wings.  First of two consecutive number 1 songs:  “Kyrie” hit top of Billboard Hot 100 in 1986.

 3.   Centerfield—John Fogerty

Peak position on Billboard Charts:  #4 Rock, #20 Hot 100 (As B-side of “Rock and Roll Girls” single).

Former Creedence Clearwater Revival leader. Major career comeback in 1985.  Song is honored by the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

2.   The Boys of Summer—Don Henley

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #1 Rock, #5 Hot 100

  Grammy award best rock performance. MTV Video of the year. Second biggest solo hit for Henley. Music composed by Mike Campbell of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

  1.  Everybody Wants to Rule the World—Tears for Fears

Peak position on Billboard Charts:   #1 Hot 100, #2 Rock

Incorporates synthesizers, drum and guitars.  Lyrics on environment, dictatorial rule, freedom, cold war, walls come tumbling down and short-lived financial success.  Message is still relevant in 2020. Perfect pop/rock song for the 80s decade.

Now that I have submitted my top 20 favorite CHR songs from 1985, I am curious to find out your thoughts on the biggest hits in America from the mid-point of the 80s decade.

Obviously, I do not want to come across as authoritative with the critique of my favorite songs from 35 years ago.  Your top songs maybe be completely different than my selections.  There are no right or wrong answers, just various opinions. What do you feel are the best, greatest or most significant CHR songs from 1985?

My reflections of the music from 35 years ago, reminds me of another excellent song that was a hit during the summer of 1985: “Glory Days” by Bruce Springsteen.  Contemporary Hit Radio was strong, vibrant and alive during 1985.  It was truly the glory days for the CHR format in America.

Living in the past is never a good thing but remembering the excellent music found on CHR radio during 1985 remains strong in my memory bank.  I leave you with lyrics from my second favorite song from 1985: “The Boys of Summer” by Don Henley:

“Out on the road today

I saw a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac

A little voice inside my head said

“Don’t look back, you can never look back”

I thought I knew what love was, what did I know?

Those days are gone forever

I should just let them go”

Long live the quintessential CHR songs of 1985:  Rock on!

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1975 Superior Singles & WROV Roanoke Memories

As I think back upon the beginning of my radio career, the opening lyrics of “Old Days” by Chicago seems to an appropriate introduction about small radio markets during 1975.

Old days, good times I remember

Fun days filled with simple pleasures

Take me back to a world gone away

Memories seem like yesterday

I grew up in Roanoke, Virginia and we didn’t have many choices to hear new music.  For TV viewing in 1975, there were only 4 options:  Local affiliates for CBS, NBC, ABC and PBS. On the radio side of broadcasting, Roanoke had 7 AM and 5 FM stations.  Of the seven AM stations, here is the breakdown of formats:

  • Top 40
  • Middle of the Road (MOR)
  • News/Talk
  • Country
  • Religious (2 stations)
  • R&B/Soul

Over on the FM band, there was even less variety:

  • Beautiful Music (2 stations)
  • Public Radio
  • Religious
  • MOR

While other radio markets had viable strong FM stations playing contemporary music such as Top 40, album rock and country back in 1975, Roanoke listeners still had to rely on AM stations to provide them with up-to-date popular music.  It took another 5 years before FM radio took hold in the Roanoke area, with the advent of K92 (WXLK) 92.3 FM on January 1st, 1980.

During the halfway point of the 70’s decade, Top 40 outlet WROV 1240 AM dominated the Roanoke radio market. The station was small in radio power:  Transmitting only 1,000 watts in the daytime and 250 watts at night.  Even though WROV’s coverage area was only 25 miles wide, the station totally controlled radio listenership within the Roanoke Valley.

I started my first job in radio at age 18, working for WROV during April 1974. I was a student at Virginia Western Community College, obtaining an Associate Degree in Radio & TV Broadcasting.

At WROV, I was hired to be a remote engineer by the Top 40 radio station.  My responsibilities at the station included setting up equipment for remote broadcasts, running the soundboard and playing records, while a WROV DJ was in charge of announcing duties.

WROV DJ Larry Bly and Music Director David Levine. Photo courtesy of DJ Steve Nelson & the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett.

My first remote broadcast with WROV in April ‘74 was with DJ Larry Bly at the Roanoke Catholic High School “Spring Carnival” event. My last worked remote for the station was with Starr Stevens at Discount Records, Tanglewood Mall in November 1975.

In between my debut with Bly and farewell broadcast with Stevens, I worked around 20 remote broadcasts with legendary WROV DJ Bart Prater.  Some of the other DJs whom I worked multiple remotes with include Chuck Holloway, Rob O’Brady, Rich Randall and Dave Hunter.

 

Most remotes were in the 3 to 4-hour range.  The longest remote I worked was on Labor Day 1975 at Lowe’s on Orange Avenue with a legendary WROV DJ from the 60’s:  Jack Fisher. It was a “solid gold holiday weekend” and I played all 50’s and early 60’s rock & roll that day.

WROV DJ Jack Fisher in front of the station building. Photo courtesy of DJ Steve Nelson & the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett.

Many of my fondest memories working at WROV are with Bart Prater.  He started at the station in 1968, coming from WOLD Marion, Virginia.  Prater spent the next 13 years of employment at WROV, before moving over to crosstown Top 40 giant K92 during 1981.

Although Prater was a shy person by nature, his radio personally came alive when the microphone switch was turned on from mute:  Prater was a shining star and delivered big as the afternoon drive DJ for WROV.

While I was employed at the station, Prater won the 1975 Billboard Magazine Medium-Market Radio Personality of the Year award.  After winning the award, I remember Bart telling me that Top 40 KILT AM Houston had offered him a job but he turned them down. Prater said, “I didn’t like the big city and Roanoke is my home.  I decided to stay here.”

Bart Prater in WROV studio. Photo courtesy of DJ Steve Nelson & the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett

I have two memories working with Bart Prater that stand out for me.  When WROV first bought a wireless microphone for the station, Bart and I were at Lakeside Amusement Park in Salem for an afternoon remote broadcast.  Around halfway through the broadcast, Prater said he wanted to test the new wireless mic by riding on the “Shooting Star” roller coaster, while live on the air.

Bart had faith that the wireless mic would work throughout the roller coaster ride and decided to test it out: Live on WROV, without a test run. Prater then hopped on the Shooting Star and recited the Lord’s prayer just before descending down the ride’s first drop.

Prater made history that day as he successfully spoke to his WROV radio audience live, while riding on the Shooting Star Roller Coaster at Lakeside Amusement Park.  Although there were a few seconds of drop out with mic coverage, Prater could be heard loud and clear throughout his historic ride. It was an event that I will never forget.

A framed WROV 70’s poster that is owned by DJ Barry Michaels: Who worked at WROV from 1978 through 1981 and provided his photo to be used here on this music blog.

My second most memorable activity with Bart happened on the first day of spring 1975. It was sunny and warm that day in Roanoke and Prater wanted to do a remote broadcast outside of the WROV building this afternoon. The station’s studios were located on the corner of 15th St and Cleveland Avenue, along the banks of the Roanoke River.

I happened to be at the station that day and Prater asked me to run the main board for a couple of hours of his afternoon DJ shift, while he did a remote broadcast outside of the WROV building.  I eagerly said yes and jumped at the chance to do a remote broadcast:  This time inside of the main WROV studio while Prater sat outside of the building with a wireless mic for the remote broadcast.

Prater got to soak up the sun at the place he fondly called “PD Bottom” and I got to run the board inside the main studio. It was thrilling for this 19-year old teen. During my two hours running the board, I played the WROV number 1 song twice that day: “Philadelphia Freedom” by Elton John.

During my time working at WROV, we had many famous rock artists drop by the station for promotional visits.  The biggest personality to appear at our studios was Wolfman Jack.

Larry Bly, Bart Prater, Wolfman Jack and Chuck Holloway in WROV studio. April 1975. Photo courtesy of DJ Steve Nelson & the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett

Canadian rock band the Guess Who performed at the Roanoke Civic Center in April and they were going to play their summer of 1974 hit, “Clap For the Wolfman” at this show.  Joining them for this one song was legendary DJ Wolfman Jack.

The day before the Guess Who concert, “The Wolfman” came by the WROV studio to be interviewed by DJ Chuck Holloway on his evening air shift.  Wolfman Jack took over the controls on the WROV board and conducted a two-hour air shift for the station that night. WROV DJs Larry Bly, Bart Prater and Chuck Holloway all were in studio when “The Wolfman” made his historic Roanoke on-air appearance.

Larry Bly and Wolfman Jack at WROV studio. April 1975. Photo Courtesy of DJ Steve Nelson & the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett.

Two other highlights happened for me at WROV during 1975:

  • I met members of the Average White Band and jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie while working a remote broadcast at Discount Records, located at Tanglewood Mall.
  • When Suzi Quatro was in Roanoke for a concert, I met her inside the WROV building.

WROV air staff outside of the WROV building. Fall 1975. Photo courtesy of DJ Steve Nelson & the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett.

The rest of this music blog is what I consider to be the best songs that I played on WROV in 1975.  I will be counting down my favorite top 20 songs from 45 years ago.

Before I start my Top 20 countdown, here are five of my favorite songs that charted below the top 20:  Either in Roanoke on WROV or nationally by Billboard and Cash Box charts:

  • Amie: Pure Prairie League
  • Tangled Up in Blue—Bob Dylan
  • Bloody Well Right—Supertramp
  • Big Yellow Taxi—Joni Mitchell
  • Young Americans—David Bowie

Now I will be counting down my favorite top 20 songs from 1975.  All the songs that I have selected meet the following criteria:

  • The song had to peak at number 20 or higher on either the Billboard Hot 100 or the Cash Box Top 100 charts.
  • I deem the songs to be culturally, historically, aesthetically significant, meaningful or relevant.
  • My top 20 selections are personal favorites and still sound fresh to me 45 years later.

Rob O’Brady in the WROV studio. Photo courtesy of DJ Steve Nelson & the WROV History Website/Pat Garrett.

As Casey Kasem used to say on American Top 40:  On with the countdown:

  1. Can’t Get It Out of my Head—Electric Light Orchestra.

Peaked at #9 Billboard Hot 100

Penned by Jeff Lynne, “Can’t Get It Out of My Head’ was the first top ten single for ELO in America.  This pop ballad is aided by the exceptional cello and violin instrumentation.

  1. Low Rider—War

Peaked at #7 Billboard Hot 100

Funk rock band War delivers a tasty treat with the toe-tapping song, “Low Rider.”  A pulsating bass line and superb saxophone playing, brings clarity to the song about lowrider hot rod cars.

  1. Calypso—John Denver.

Peaked #1 Billboard Hot 100: As B-side to “I’m Sorry.” 9/75 (One Week)

Peaked #2 Billboard Hot 100: Later as A-side hit 10/75 (Four Weeks)

John Denver composed a tribute song for ocean conservationist Jacques-Yves Cousteau and his research ship, the Calypso in 1975.  Originally the B-side of the “I’m Sorry” singles, “Calypso” actually became the bigger hit, by logging 4 consecutive weeks at number 2 as an A-side hit.

  1. Old Days—Chicago

Peaked at #5 Billboard Hot 100

Chicago band member James Pankow wrote the song “Old Days” that reminisces about childhood memories.  With the brass instrument combination of trombone, trumpet and saxophone, this tune shines musically by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame rock band.

  1. Pick Up the Pieces—Average White Band

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100

As I stated above, I met Hamish Stuart and the rest of the Average White Band in 1975 while working at WROV.  “Pick Up the Pieces” is basically an instrumental and the music phenomenal: Saxophonist Roger Ball is exceptional laying down the groove on this tune.

  1. I’m Not in Love—10cc

Peaked at #2 Billboard Hot 100

One of the most distinctive singles of 1975 is “I’m Not in Love.”  10cc spent countless hours and weeks in the studio creating this masterpiece: Recording musical back tracks and multitracked vocals on the biggest American hit for the band.

14. #9 Dream—John Lennon

Peaked at #9 Billboard Hot 100

To be sure, “#9 Dream” has nonsensical lyrics: “Ah! böwakawa poussé, poussé.” Obviously, John Lennon had recorded other songs about the #9 before: The Beatles, “Revolution 9”and “One After 909.”  No matter the lyrical content, this was one of Lennon’s best singles during the mid 70’s.

  • Baker’s Dozen: These 1980 songs are the cream of the crop.
  1. Magic—Pilot

Peaked at #5 Billboard Hot 100

Scottish rock band Pilot blended “Sunshine Rock” and “Power Pop Rock” to achieve their only American hit record with their song, Magic.” Infectious guitar riffs and bright, sunny lyrics, helped to create the finest “one hit wonder” single of 1975.

  1. Sister Golden Hair—America

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100

Among the many soft rock bands of the 70’s, America was one of the most successful in that genre of music. “Sister Golden Hair” features dueling 12 string and slide guitars, plus excellent harmonies by band members Dan Peek, Gerry Beckley and Dewey Bunnell.

  1. Black Water—Doobie Brothers

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100

Nationally, “Black Water” was a hit during March 1975. It was a hit much earlier in Roanoke as WROV’s music director Chuck Holloway stated playing the song as an album cut during September 1974.  The Doobie Brothers song became a number 1 song in Roanoke and then Warner Brothers Records released “Black Water” as a single.

WROV received a gold record for being the first radio station to play and break “Black Water” as a hit song in America. You can read more about how WROV’s Chuck Holloway helped to make the Doobie Brothers song popular, on a music blog message that I published last October:  1974 Singles:  The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

  1. Shining Star—Earth Wind & Fire

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100

My love for Earth Wind & Fire started when I played “Shining Star” for the first time on WROV.  The up-tempo groove that the funk/R&B/pop/rock band performs on the song is marvelous. I feel that the 45-rpm single of “Shining Star” is 2 minutes and 50 seconds of perfection.

  1. Jive Talkin’—Bee Gees

Peaked at #1  Billboard Hot 100

The Gibb Brothers made a comeback with “Jive Talkin’” during 1975. An excellent bass line sets the rhythmic tone for the tune.  Combining the opening scratchy guitar with a funky synth bass line, I consider this song to be the Bee Gees musical crown jewel, with their vast catalog of hit records.

  1. Junior’s Farm—Paul McCartney & Wings

Peaked at #3 Billboard Hot 100

I have always enjoyed the smokin’ hot rocking sound and whimsical lyrics of “Junior’s Farm.”  Wings guitarists Jimmy McCulloch and Denny Laine trade superb guitar licks, while Paul McCartney’s bass chord progression is solid. The record proved that Sir Paul could record more than just silly love songs.

  1. Fame—David Bowie

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100

Early 70’s androgynous appearance of David Bowie as Ziggy Stardust transformed into a more mainstream look when “Fame” became a funk/rock hit.  John Lennon helped co-write the song, sings backup and repeats the word, “Fame” multiple times with a quirky falsetto expanding three octaves, towards the end of the record.

  1. Killer Queen—Queen

Peaked at #12 Billboard Hot 100

Outstanding vocal harmonies are exhibited by Queen as they had their first hit record in America with “Killer Queen.”  Written by band front man Freddie Mercury, the song has a striking bass line and a prominent guitar solo by Brain May.

  1. Miracles—Jefferson Starship

Peaked at #3 Billboard Hot 100

60’s rock band Jefferson Airplane reinvented itself in the mid 70’s and became Jefferson Starship. Marty Balin wrote and sang lead on “Miracles.”  Highlight on the song include, David Freiberg’s organ, Papa John Creach on violin, Paul Kantner’s guitar and backing vocals by Grace Slick.

 

  1. You’re No Good—Linda Ronstadt

Peaked at #1 Billboard Hot 100

Linda Ronstadt reached superstardom with her cover version of “You’re No Good.” Backing musicianship on the song is impressive.  A driving bass line, superior guitar riffs and a sparse drumming pattern, generates a haunting melody.  I have fond memories of Ronstadt singing this song when I attended her Roanoke concert during May 1975.

  1. Free Bird—Lynyrd Skynyrd

Peaked at #19 Billboard Hot 100

Some may disagree, but I believe that “Free Bird” is the greatest Southern Rock song of all time.  Written by Lynyrd Skynyrd band members Allen Collins Ronnie Van Zant, the song has two distinct parts:  It starts as a power ballad and then transforms into blazing multiple guitar instrumental jam for the remainder of the tune.  Without a doubt, “Free Bird’ rocks!

  1. One of These Nights—Eagles

Peaked at #1. Billboard Hot 100

Coming in at number two on my 1975 countdown is “One of These Nights” by rock band Eagles. Don Henley sings lead while Randy Meisner contributes backup high harmony, on this song that features tight harmonies, urgent beats and superb guitar hooks.

Eagles was my favorite band when I worked at WROV and I had the pleasure of attending one of their concerts at the Roanoke Civic Center during May 1975. With Linda Ronstadt opening up for the Eagles, this was the best rock concert that I attended during the 70’s.  I loved hearing “One of These Nights” performed live that evening in Roanoke.

  1. Born to Run—Bruce Springsteen

Peaked at #17 Cash Box and #23 Billboard

Although “Born to Run” wasn’t a big hit on WROV, or on Top 40 radio, it has become the signature song for Bruce Springsteen.  It is my number 1 favorite song of 1975.

Just a couple of months after the “Born to Run” album and title track single was released, Springsteen made history:  The Boss became the first rock artist to simultaneously land of the covers of Time and Newsweek magazine on October 27th, 1975.

I love how Phil Spector’s, “Wall of Sound” musical production technique is utilized by Springsteen and Clarence Clemons’ excellent saxophone playing on “Born to Run.”

My friend Dave Delaney of Roanoke recently wrote to me his thoughts on Springsteen’s break though hit, and his critique of the song is spot on:

“I’ve always loved the song “Born to Run” for multiple reasons: It has all the qualities of a perfect rock song with all its ducks in a row:

  • A great hook.
  • Heart-felt longing lyrics that make you care about what’s going to happen to the characters, with a hint of rebellion and teen passion.
  • A blistering saxophone solo.
  • Tonal contour, with Bruce sounding alternately exhausted and energized in the bridge.
  • * Add in its basic epic and anthemic quality, and it makes a complete musical statement in a tidy and radio-friendly 4-1/2 minutes.”

As Dave Delaney described above, “Born to Run” is a perfect rock song.  This epic ode is my absolute favorite single that I played on WROV during 1975.

Now that I have submitted my favorite song listing for the Top 20 singles of 1975, I am curious to find out your thoughts on the biggest hits from 45 years ago. What do you consider to be the best Top 40 singles from the midway point of the 70’s decade?

Obviously, I do not want to come across as authoritative with the critique of my favorite songs from 1975.  Your top songs maybe be completely different than my selections.  There are no right or wrong answers:  Just various opinions on the songs that I played on WROV during 1975.

I also would love to read any comments that you may have about WROV, Roanoke radio, or any other opinions about 1975 Top 40 radio across the American landscape.

My dog Penny Lane listening to Bruce Springsteen’s song, “Born to Run” on August 25th, 2020.

The memories that I have playing superior singles and working at legendary Top 40 WROV Roanoke in 1975, remains fresh in my mind.  I will remember and cherish those days forever.

This message started with opening lyrics from Chicago’s, “Old Days” and will close with ending words from the same excellent 1975 composition.  Rock on!

In my mind and in my heart to stay

Darkened dreams of good times gone away

Days of love and feeling fancy free

Days of magic still so close to me

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Broadcasting, Music, Music Countdowns, Radio, Retro Rock

1980 Top 40 Hits: Still Excellent 40 Years Later

1980 was a transitional year.  Musically, disco was dead and it was prior to the synth-pop, MTV explosion that happened the following year.  The backlash against disco was strong.

It was a diverse mixture of songs that dominated Top 40 radio during 1980.  Yacht Rock, adult contemporary power ballads, country crossovers and traditional classic rock ruled the airways.

Songs from films were also popular on the radio in 1980.  Music from “Urban Cowboy” and “Xanadu” were on the hot rotations of many Top 40 outlets.

Adult Oriented Rock (AOR) FM radio stations flourished during this year, taking away listeners from Top 40 formatted stations.  AOR FM radio in 1980 tended to have less talk than Top 40 stations and played mostly what is now considered, “Classic Rock.”

As many folks gravitated towards AOR radio, the classic rock genre of music flourished.  AOR was different from traditional Top 40 radio:  These new AOR FM stations played multiple, deep cut album selections, instead of just hit singles.

If I had been programming an AOR radio station during 1980, here are the ten albums that I would have featured on my station’s hot rotation.  There are no rankings with my list.

Album cover: “The River” by Bruce Springsteen. One of my favorite albums from 1980.

The River. Bruce Springsteen

Zenyatta Mondatta—The Police

Double Fantasy—John Lennon & Yoko Ono

Boy—U2

Glass Houses—Billy Joel

Back in Back—AC/DC

Remain in Light—Talking Heads

Hi Infidelity—REO Speedwagon

The Game—Queen

Making Movies—Dire Straits

Album cover for “Boy” by U2. One of my favorite albums from 1980.

Other areas of transition for music during 1980:

  • Eagles broke up for the first time as band members could not stand, tolerate or co-exist with each other after completing their summer touring schedule.
  • Led Zeppelin disbanded after Member John Bonham was found dead in September
  • Elton John played to a crowd of 400,000 people with a free concert in New York’s Central park.
  • John Lennon was assassinated in New York on December 8th.
  • Sony Walkman was introduced as a new portable way listening to music.
  • Cross genres of artists working together to create hit songs: Barry Gibb with Barbara Streisand and Lionel Ritchie with Kenny Rogers

Changes also happened in my personal life during 1980.  I graduated from James Madison University (JMU) in Harrisonburg, Virginia and located back to my Roanoke, Virginia home in May.  I have fond memories of my time attending JMU and working at radio station WMRA.

My parents Andy and Shirley Woodson, along with my sisters Kathryn and Lisa:  With me just after my graduation from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. May 1980

While I was a student at JMU from 1978 through 1980, I was employed by WMRA Harrisonburg, a Public Radio station serving the Shenandoah Valley.  As a college student, I always scheduled my JMU classes not to interfere with my various shifts at the radio station.

During my senior year at JMU, I was the producer and radio host for the program called “Country Afternoon.”  This daily Monday through Friday mid afternoon show featured bluegrass, folk and old-time country music.  Below is an aircheck of me hosting Country Afternoon on 3/31/80.

Another program that I hosted on a regular basis was an album rock show called “After Hours.”

This AOR broadcast happened Monday through Friday between 10:00 PM and 2:00 AM. I also have an aircheck of when I hosted After Hours on 4/1/80 below.

Since I started my radio career at legendary Top 40 WROV 1240 AM Roanoke in 1974, I always have been drawn listening to any radio station that featured the Top 40 format.

My time in Harrisonburg gave me an opportunity to hear various Top 40 stations on any given day.  The local Top 40 station that most JMU students listened to was WQPO 101.7 FM in Harrisonburg, I didn’t care for that station as it was automated with no live DJs.  I preferred tuning in WWWV 97.5 FM in Charlottesville as they were an AOR formatted station.

To get my fix of Top 40 radio while I was a student at JMU, I would listen to stations out of Richmond, Roanoke and the Washington DC radio markets.  Picking up these stations tended to be hit or miss, depending on the weather conditions. Cloudy days seemed to be the best opportunity hearing these signals coming in strong at my Harrisonburg home.

These are the Top 40 radio signals that I could pick up on a regular basis in Harrisonburg during 1980:

  • K92 FM 92.3 Roanoke
  • Q99 FM 99.1 Roanoke
  • Q94 FM 94.5 Richmond
  • WPGC 95.5 FM Washington DC Market
  • Q107 107.3 FM Washington DC Market

How I listened to music in 1980. My parents gave me a Sony “Boom Box” for Christmas that year.

Between Christmas and New Year’s Eve 1980, I remember listing to Roanoke Top 40 stations K92 and WROV on my new Sony Boom Box, as they played the biggest hits during that year.  What were the most popular singles of 1980?   Here are the Top 10 Songs on the 1980 Year-end Top 100 Songs according to Billboard:

  1. Call Me—Blondie
  2. Another Brick in the Wall, Part II—Pink Floyd
  3. Magic—Olivia Newton John
  4. Rock With You—Michael Jackson
  5. Do That To Me One More Time—Captain & Tennille
  6. Crazy Little Thing Called Love—Queen
  7. Coming Up—Paul McCartney
  8. Funkytown Lipps Inc
  9. It’s Still Rock and Roll To Me—Billy Joel
  10. The Rose—Bette Midler

For the rest of this message, I will be counting down my Top 20 singles from 1980.  If a song didn’t make the Billboard Year-End Hot 100 singles chart of 1980, then I didn’t consider listing that song on my Top 20 countdown.

The 20 songs from 1980 that I have selected all meet certain criteria:  These selections happen to be my Top 20 personal favorites from 1980:  The songs are not dated and still sound fresh to me 40 years later.  I deem the songs to be culturally, historically, aesthetically significant, meaningful or relevant.

Before I reveal my Top 20 songs, I want to share with you some of the artists who charted with either double or triple hits within the Billboard Top 100 chart for 1980:

Eagles had 3 songs in the Top 100:

  • Heartbreak Tonight
  • I Can’t Tell You Why
  • The Long Run

Billy Joel

  • It’s Still Rock and Roll To Me
  • You May be Right

Christopher Cross

  • Ride Like the Wind
  • Sailing

Linda Ronstadt

  • How Do I Make You
  • Hurt So Bad

Fleetwood Mac

  • Sara
  • Tusk

My go to reference for highest peaking chart positions with my Top 20 songs is, “The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits” by Joel Whitburn. I consider Whitburn’s book to be the “bible” of Top 40 music reference and still proudly own a hard copy of this excellent book.

The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits by Joel Whitburn

Without further ado, here are my 20 favorite songs from 1980:

  1. Fire Lake—Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band

Peaked at #6:  67th biggest song of 1980

The first single from the album, “Against the Wind” was an excellent departure for Michigan native Bob Seger.  “Fire Lake” utilizes an acoustic guitar, which provides a wonderful mixture of R&B, folk and country blended sounds.

  1. Breakdown Dead Ahead—Boz Scaggs

Peaked at #15:  97th biggest song of 1980

Yacht Rock was huge on Top 40 radio in 1980 and singer-songwriter Boz Scaggs had two terrific songs in that genre to chart that year. “Jojo” and “Breakdown Dead Ahead” further cemented the terrific guitarist as a force musically, combining smooth jazz, R&B and soft rock.

  1. You May Be Right—Billy Joel

Peaked at #7:  75th biggest song of 1980

The first of two Billy Joel songs on my countdown, “You May Be Right” was a straight ahead, up-tempo rocker: Which was quite different from the piano based, power ballads that the Bronx, New York singer had recorded earlier in his career. The first single from the “Glass Houses” album, helped to solidify Joel as a premier American male vocalist during this time period.

  1. Biggest Part of Me—Ambrosia

Peaked at #3:  27th biggest song of 1980

Excellent musicianship is a calling card for the band Ambrosia and their huge summer of 1980 hit “Biggest Part of Me.”  Blending of vocal harmonies with percussion, saxophone, organ and guitar, makes this tune a classic Yacht Rock winner.

  1. We Don’t Talk Anymore—Cliff Richard

Peaked at #7:  45th biggest song of 1980

A world-wide smash, “We Don’t Talk Anymore” was the biggest selling single for Cliff Richard.  With the song peaking at number 7 in America, Richard became the first artist to reach the Top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100 during 4 separate decades:  The 50s, 60s, 70s and the 80’s.

  1. Don’t Do Me Like That—Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

Peaked at #10:  64th biggest song of 1980

The first of two Tom Petty songs on my countdown, “Don’t Do me Like That” became the first Top 10 hit for the leader of the Heartbreakers.  The interplay of dueling guitars and the urgent vocal delivery by Petty brings unity to this Heartland Rock classic tune.

  1. Cool Change—Little River Band

Peaked at #10:  56th biggest song of 1980

One of the biggest Australian groups of the 70’s, Little River Band ushered in 1980 with their flowing masterpiece: Enjoying a solitary lifestyle with nature, by sailing on the ocean. “Cool Change” was named by the Australasian Performing Right Association in 2001, as one of the Top 30 Australian songs of all time.

  • Baker’s Dozen:  These 1980 songs are the cream of the crop.
  1. This Is It—Kenny Loggins

Peaked at #11:  28th biggest song of 1980

Two of the biggest names in Yacht Rock are Kenny Loggins and Michael McDonald and this duo co-wrote the song “This Is It.”  Their collaboration included McDonald singing backup vocals on the song and it won a Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance in 1981. The paring of Loggins and McDonald on this tune is Yacht Rock royalty.

  1. Heartbreaker—Pat Benatar

Peaked at #23:  83rd biggest song of 1980

Nobody rocked harder than Pat Benatar on her breakthrough hit “Heartbreaker” during the first 3 months of 1980.  With hot rocking, flame throwing vocals and blazing guitars laying down catchy hooks, Benatar’s career soared in popularity during the rest of the 80s decade.

  1. Ride Like the Wind—Christopher Cross

Peaked at #2:  17th biggest song of 1980

The first of two Christopher Cross songs on my countdown, “Ride Like the Wind” was the first single released from the self-titled debut “Christopher Cross” album.  Produced by Michael Omartian, and backup vocals by Michael McDonald, this hit paved the way for Cross to be the king of soft rock singing during the early 80’s.

Peaked at #1:  3rd biggest song of 1980

“Magic” was the lead single from the “Xanadu” soundtrack: Which featured Olivia Newton-John both singing and acting in this musical fantasy film.  The song spent 4 weeks at number one during the summer of 1980 and is Newton-John’s second biggest hit of all time. “Magic” is yet another song that is regularly played on SiriusXM’s Yacht Rock radio here in year 2020.

  1. Babe—Styx

Peaked at #1:  20th biggest song of 1980

Styx band member Dennis DeYoung wrote the song, “Babe” as a birthday present for his wife Suzanne.  This power ballad became the only number 1 song by Styx and was the lead single from the album “Cornerstone” and features a tremendous guitar solo by Tommy Shaw.

  1. Romeo’s Tune—Steve Forbert

Peaked at #11:  60th biggest song of 1980

An excellent example of Power Pop Rock is “Romeo’s Tune” by Steve Forbert.  It was an international smash but is considered a “one hit wonder” in America. Interestingly, the title of Forbert’s only Billboard Top 40 hit doesn’t appear in the lyrics of the song.

  1. It’s Still Rock and Roll To me—Billy Joel

Peaked at #1:  9th biggest song of 1980

Billy Joel’s second song on my countdown is, “It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me.”  Lyrics of Joel’s first number 1 song on the Billboard Hot 100 was a reaction to newer music styles like, New Wave and Punk Rock.  This ode to “Rock and Roll” has an awesome saxophone solo and was the biggest hit for summer 1980.

  1. Cars—Gary Numan

Peaked at #9:  12th biggest song of 1980

Perhaps the catchiest song during 1980 was “Cars” by Gary Neman.  I describe the song as, New Wave meets conventional pop/rock.  Traditional rhythms of guitar, bass and drums were mixed with keyboard synthesisers, and helped to produce a harmonious effect.  Neman’s single is considered one of the best “one hit wonders” of the 80’s.

  1. Refugee—Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

Peaked at #15:  100th biggest song of 1980

Tom Petty’s second song on my countdown is “Refugee.”   This has all the elements of a perfect rock song:  Infectious guitar riffs, searing bass lines and strong dominate vocals. Superb melody, plus the call and response during the chorus, makes “Refugee” undeniably an exceptional classic rock song.

  1. Longer—Dan Fogelberg

Peaked at #2:  33rd biggest song of 1980

During the 70’s, Dan Fogelberg primarily released rock-oriented songs but his 1980 hit was completely different.  “Longer” was actually a melodic love song, with flowing harmonies and sparse instrumentation. Fogelberg’s crown jewel became a staple at thousands of weddings starting in 1980 and lasting throughout the rest of the decade.

  1. Another Brick in the Wall, Part II—Pink Floyd

Peaked at #1:  2nd biggest song of 1980

“We don’t need no education, we don’t need no thought control” starts the lyrics for “Another Brick in the Wall, Part II” which is a track from Pink Floyd’s album, “The Wall.”   Written by Roger Waters, his “rock opera” protest song about rigid schooling is brilliant.  The music incorporates, progressive rock, hard rock and even has elements of disco. Without a doubt, this Pink Floyd single is a shining gem.

  1. Call Me—Blondie

Peaked at #1: Ranked 1st:  As the biggest song of 1980

The biggest record of 1980 was “Call Me” by Blondie.  It was the theme song for the film “American Gigolo” and blended various forms of rock music:  New Wave, hard rock and dance rock.  Debbie Harry leads with passionate vocals, while the musicians provides catchy guitar hooks and blazing bass line interfusion. Billboard proclaims, “Call Me” as the 9th best overall single of the 80’s.

  1. Sailing—Christopher Cross

Peaked at #1:  32nd biggest songs of 1980

Christopher Cross’ second song on my countdown is “Sailing” and his composition is absolutely my favorite number 1 selection from 1980. Cross won 3 Grammy Awards with his written ode to sailing: Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Arrangement of the Year.  His single also holds the distinction of being the “Greatest Yacht Rock” song of all time.  Without a doubt, my number 1 song of 1980 is “Sailing” by Christopher Cross.

For those regular readers of this music blog, it isn’t surprising that a majority of my top selections on the countdown were Yacht Rock songs.  My love for this genre of music was documented two years ago on the message, “This is It: Yacht Rock” on DJ Dave’s Musical Musings blog.

My photo of yachts and other boats in the harbor at Camden, Maine.

The second favorite type of music that I favored on my 1980 countdown is Classic Rock.  I do love many other types of music but variations of rock always dominate my preferred classification of musical genres.

Now that I have submitted my favorite song listing for the Top 20 singles of 1980, I am curious to find out your thoughts on the biggest hits from 40 years ago.

Obviously, I do not want to come across as authoritative with the critique of my favorite songs from 1980.  Your top songs maybe be completely different than my selections.  There are no right or wrong answers:  Just various opinions on the Billboard Top 100 year-end 1980 listing and my Top 20 countdown of favorite songs listed above.

What do you consider to be the best top 40 hits from 1980?  I welcome your thoughts.  The chorus for Billy Joel’s summer of 1980 number 1 hit seems like an appropriate ending to this message:

“Everybody’s talkin’ ’bout the new sound

Funny, but it’s still rock and roll to me”

Rock on!

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